Graciliano Monteiro Passos > Date-Object > Date::Object

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NAME ^

Date::Object - Handles dates/calendars/timezones and it's representation/convertions using a single Date::Object.

DESCRIPTION ^

Date::Object is an alternative to the DateTime modules, with the main pourpose to handle dates using a single object or make multiple Date::Objects work together to calculate and handle dates.

Other main poupose of Date::Object is to find a simple way to store dates in a persistent enverioment (any database) using a simple INTEGER field. The use of a INTEGER field for that make possible searches in the DB by ranges, what is impossible with normal storages of dates, specially if they are saved as STRING, generally in the comon format of "YYYY-MM-DD". Also an INTEGER field have all the informations of a date, including year, month, day, hour, minute, second and timezone. Other good thing is that any DB supports INTEGER fields, what doesn't make our Perl code dependent of the SQL nuances of each different way to handle dates of each DB.

See the method serial() for DB usage.

USAGE ^

  use Date::Object ;

  ...
  
  my $date = new Date::Object( time() ) ;
  
  my $date2 = new Date::Object( $date ) ;

  ...

  my $date = new Date::Object( 2004 , 2 , 29 , 12 , 30 , 10 ) ;

  print $date->date ; ## 2004-02-29 12:30:10

  $date->set_local ;
  ...
  $date->set_zone(-3) ;

  print $date->date ; ## 2004-02-29 09:30:10
  
  ...
  
  print $date->year ;
  print $date->month ;
  print $date->day ;
  
  ...
  
  print "$date->{year}\n" ;
  print "$date->{month}\n" ;
  print "$date->{hour}\n" ;
  
  ...
  
  print $date->hour ; ## hh:mm:ss
  
  ...

  print $date->ymd ; ## yyyy-mm-dd
  print $date->mdy ; ## mm-dd-yyyy
  print $date->dmy ; ## dd-mm-yyyy
  print $date->hms ; ## hh:mm:ss
  
  ...
  
  if ( $date_0 == $date_1 ) {...}
  if ( $date_0 > $date_1 ) {...}

NEW ^

To create a Date::Object you can use different types of arguments:

TIME
  Date::Object->new( time() ) ;
YEAR , MONTH , DAY , HOUR , MIN , SEC , ZONE
  Date::Object->new( 2004 , 12 , 25 , 15 , 30 , 59 ) ;
YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS formats:
  Date::Object->new( "2004/12/25 15:30:59" ) ;
  Date::Object->new( "2004/12/25 15:30:59" , 'ymd' ) ;
  
  Date::Object->new( "25/12/2004 15:30:59" , 'dmy' ) ;
  
  Date::Object->new( "12/25/2004 15:30:59" , 'mdy' ) ;
Date::Object
  Date::Object->new( $another_date_object ) ;
NULL

When arguments are not sent the actual time() will be used.

You also can use this extra contructors to handle the timezone and the serial:

new_gmt

Create a new Date::Object in the GMT timezone.

  my $d_gmt = Date::Object::new_gmt() ;

new_local

Create a new Date::Object in the local timezone.

  my $d_gmt = Date::Object::new_local() ;

new_zone(ZONE , ...)

Create a new Date::Object in the given ZONE (timezone).

Examples:

  my $d0 = Date::Object::new_zone(-3) ;
  my $d1 = Date::Object::new_zone(-3 , 2004 , 1 , 1 , 12 , 30 , 00) ;
  
  ...

  my $d_gmt = Date::Object::new_gmt() ;
  my $d_local = Date::Object::new_zone(-3 , $d_gmt) ;

new_serial(SERIAL)

Create a new Date::Object using a serial INTEGER. See serial() for more.

METHODS ^

add_day (N)

Add N days in the date. By default N is 1.

add_hour

Add N hours in the date. By default N is 1.

add_min

Add N minutes in the date. By default N is 1.

add_month

Add N months in the date. By default N is 1.

Note that this is not the same to add 30 days! The function will make a plus only in the month, and will incremente automatically the year and also will handle the month days if needed, like Feb-29.

add_sec

Add N seconds in the date. By default N is 1.

add_week

Add N weeks in the date. By default N is 1.

add_year

Add N years in the date. By default N is 1.

check (YEAR , MONTH , DAY)

Check if a given date exists. Returns BOOLEAN.

Also can be used as a static method/function.

clone

Return a copy of the previous object.

date

Return the date in the format:

  YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS

Example:

  2004-03-20 23:20:34

date_zone

Return the date in the format:

  YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS ZONE

Example:

  2004-03-20 23:20:34 -0300

day

Return the day of the date.

days_between (DATEOBJECT | DATE )

Return the number of days between 2 date objects.

Example of use:

  my $d0 = Date::O(2004 , 1 , 1) ;
  my $d1 = Date::O(2005 , 1 , 1) ;
  
  if ( $d0->days_between($d1) == 366 ) {...}

days_from

Return the number of days from a given date.

days_until

Return the number of days until a given date.

dmy

Return the date in the format:

  DD-MM-YYYY

gmtime(TIME)

Return the same values of the core function gmtime(), but the values will be formated, soo, in the year 1900 will be added, to month 1 is added, and numbers less than 10 0 will be added in the begin:

  my ($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = Date::O()->gmtime ;
  print "$sec,$min,$hour , $mday,$mon,$year , $wday,$yday,$isdst\n" ;

The output:

  21,05,00 , 21,03,2004 , 0,80,0

hms

Return the date in the format:

  HH:MM:SS

hour

The hour of the date.

hours_between

See days_between().

hours_from

See days_from().

hours_until

See days_until().

isdst

Is true if the specified time occurs during daylight savings time.

localtime

Same as gmtime(), but fot the local timezone.

See gmtime().

mdy

Return the date in the format:

  MM-DD-YYYY

min

The minutes of the date.

min_between

See days_between().

min_from

See days_from().

min_until

See days_until().

month

The month of the date.

months_between

See days_between().

months_from

See days_from().

months_until

See days_until().

sec

The seconds of the date.

secs_between

See days_between().

secs_from

See days_from().

secs_until

See days_until().

serial

Return a serial number that can be used to serialize this date object.

Useful to save in some database, and to realod it in the future.

The serial is an INTEGER based in the time() of the date and the zone in the end. Soo, you can make searches in the DB by ranges of dates:

  my $d_init = Date::Object::new(2004 , 1 , 1) ;
  my $d_end = Date::Object::new(2004 , 2 , 1) ;
  
  ...
  
  my $init = $d_init->serial ;
  my $end = $d_end->serial ;
  
  "SELECT * FROM foo WHERE (date >= $init && date <= $end)"

To save it in the DB:

  my $d_serial = $d_init->serial ;
  
  ...
  
  "INSERT INTO foo(date) values($d_serial)"

To load:

  my $d_serial = "SELECT date FROM foo WHERE (id == 1)" ;
  
  my $date = Date::Object::new_serial($d_serial) ;

set (YEAR , MONTH , DAY , HOUR , MIN , SEC)

Set the date of the object. If some argument is undef, the previous value of the pbject will be used as default.

set_gmt

Set the date to the GMT timezone (0).

set_local

Set the date to the local timezone.

set_zone (ZONE)

Set the date to a ginve ZONE (timezone).

sub_day

See add_day().

sub_hour

See add_hour().

sub_min

See add_min().

sub_month

See add_month().

sub_sec

See add_sec().

sub_week

See add_week().

sub_year

See add_year().

time

The time of the date, with all the seconds from 1970-1-1 until the date, same format of the core function time().

timelocal (YEAR , MONTH , DAY , HOUR , MIN , SEC , ZONE)

Create a time() integer with the given arguments.

wday

The week day of the date, in the range of 0..6, where 0 is Sunday.

weeks_between

See days_between().

weeks_from

See days_from().

weeks_until

See days_until().

yday

The year day of the date, in the range of 1..365 (or 1..366).

year

The year day of the date. Example: 2004

years_between

See days_between().

years_from

See days_from().

years_until

See days_until().

ymd

Return the date in the format:

  YYYY-MM-DD

zone

Return the zone of the date. The format is a floating number. Soo, for the timzone -0300, the number is -3, and for -0330 is -3.3

zone_gmt

The timezone from the GMT as a full string.

Format:

  [+-]HHMM

Examples:

  -0300
  +0000

ALIASES ^

Date::O

Date::Object->new

Date::O_gmt

Date::Object->new_gmt

Date::O_local

Date::Object->new_local

Date::O_zone

Date::Object->new_zone

Date::check

Date::Object::check

Date::timelocal

Date::Object::timelocal

y

$date->year

mo

$date->month

d

$date->day

h

$date->hour

m

$date->min

s

$date->sec

z

$date->zone

Key Access ^

You also can access the date attributes using the object/hash keys:

Day:

  $date->{d}
  $date->{day}

Hour:

  $date->{h}
  $date->{hour}

Minutes:

  $date->{m}
  $date->{min}

Seconds:

  $date->{s}
  $date->{sec}

Month:

  $date->{mo}
  $date->{month}

Year:

  $date->{y}
  $date->{year}

Week day:

  $date->{wday}

Year day:

  $date->{yday}

Daylight savings

  $date->{isdst}

This keys are the same of a method call:

  $date->{date}
  $date->{date_zone}

  $date->{ymd}
  $date->{dmy}
  $date->{mdy}
  $date->{hms}

  $date->{serial}
  $date->{time}

  $date->{z}
  $date->{zone}
  $date->{zone_gmt}

SEE ALSO ^

DateTime, Class::HPLOO, HPL.

The Perl DateTime Project: http://datetime.perl.org

Class::HPLOO ^

This module was built with Class::HPLOO, that make Classes definition easier and smaller in Perl.

When sending patches or any type of code for this module take a look in the sources in the .hploo files, and not in the .pm, since the .pm files are generated automatically from the .hploo files.

AUTHOR ^

Graciliano M. P. <gm@virtuasites.com.br>

I will appreciate any type of feedback (include your opinions and/or suggestions). ;-P

COPYRIGHT ^

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

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