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NAME ^

gitbunch - Manage gitbunch directory (directory which contain git repos)

VERSION ^

This document describes version 0.48 of gitbunch (from Perl distribution Git-Bunch), released on 2015-09-03.

SYNOPSIS ^

Usage:

 % gitbunch check [options] <source>
 % gitbunch exec [options] <source> <command>...
 % gitbunch sync [options] <source> <target>

DESCRIPTION ^

SUBCOMMANDS ^

check

Check status of git repositories inside gitbunch directory.

Will perform a 'git status' for each git repositories inside the bunch and report which repositories are clean/unclean.

Will die if can't chdir into bunch or git repository.

exec

Execute a command for each repo in the bunch.

For each git repository in the bunch, will chdir to it and execute specified command.

sync

Synchronize bunch to another bunch.

For each git repository in the bunch, will perform a 'git pull/push' for each branch. If repository in destination doesn't exist, it will be rsync-ed first from source. When 'git pull' fails, will exit to let you fix the problem manually.

For all other non-git repos, will simply synchronize by one-way rsync.

OPTIONS ^

* marks required options.

Common options

--config-path=filename

Set path to configuration file.

Can be specified multiple times.

--config-profile=s

Set configuration profile to use.

--debug

Set log level to debug (note: you also need to set LOG=1 to enable logging, or use DEBUG=1).

--format=s

Choose output format, e.g. json, text.

Default value:

 undef
--help, -h, -?

Display help message and exit.

--json

Set output format to json.

--log-level=s

Set log level (note: you also need to set LOG=1 to enable logging).

--naked-res

When outputing as JSON, strip result envelope.

Default value:

 0

By default, when outputing as JSON, the full enveloped result is returned, e.g.:

    [200,"OK",[1,2,3],{"func.extra"=>4}]

The reason is so you can get the status (1st element), status message (2nd element) as well as result metadata/extra result (4th element) instead of just the result (3rd element). However, sometimes you want just the result, e.g. when you want to pipe the result for more post-processing. In this case you can use `--naked-res` so you just get:

    [1,2,3]
--no-config

Do not use any configuration file.

--no-env

Do not read environment for default options.

--quiet

Set log level to quiet (note: you also need to set LOG=1 to enable logging, or use QUIET=1).

--subcommands

List available subcommands.

--trace

Set log level to trace (note: you also need to set LOG=1 to enable logging, or use TRACE=1).

--verbose

Set log level to info (note: you also need to set LOG=1 to enable logging, or use VERBOSE=1).

--version, -v

Display program's version and exit.

Options for subcommand check

--exclude-files

Exclude files from processing.

This only applies to `sync_bunch` operations. Operations like `check_bunch` and `exec_bunch` already ignore these and only operate on git repos.

--exclude-non-git-dirs

Exclude non-git dirs from processing.

This only applies to and `sync_bunch` operations. Operations like `check_bunch` and `exec_bunch` already ignore these and only operate on git repos.

--exclude-repos-json=s

Exclude some repos from processing (JSON-encoded).

See --exclude-repos.

--exclude-repos-pat=s

Specify regex pattern of repos to exclude.

--exclude-repos=s@

Exclude some repos from processing.

Can be specified multiple times.

--include-files

Alias for --no-exclude-files.

See --exclude-files.

--include-non-git-dirs

Alias for --no-exclude-non-git-dirs.

See --exclude-non-git-dirs.

--include-repos-json=s

Specific git repos to sync, if not specified all repos in the bunch will be processed (JSON-encoded).

See --include-repos.

--include-repos-pat=s

Specify regex pattern of repos to include.

--include-repos=s@

Specific git repos to sync, if not specified all repos in the bunch will be processed.

Can be specified multiple times.

--repo=s

Only process a single repo.

--sort=s

Order entries in bunch.

Default value:

 "-commit-timestamp"

Valid values:

 ["name","-name","mtime","-mtime","rand","commit-timestamp","-commit-timestamp","db-commit-timestamp","-db-commit-timestamp"]

If sorting is enabled, the repos will be sorted first by some ordering. One use-case for this is to allow more recently committed-to repos to be processed first (using `-commit-timestamp` or `-db-commit-timestamp`).

`db-commit-timestamp` (or `-db-commit-timestamp`) reads SQLite database file `repos.db` in the source directory and to get last commit timestamp information (in the `repos` table, the `commit_timestamp` column). You will need to create and maintain this database, e.g. in your post-commit script. Repos or dirs not having the last commit information in the database will be processed later. This method is faster than `commit-timestamp` (or `-commit-timestamp`, see next paragraph) if your source directory contains lots (e.g. hundreds or thousands) of repos because you avoid having to stat() each `.git/commit-timestamp` file in each repo.

`commit-timestamp` (or `-commit-timestamp`) compares the timestamp of `.git/commit-timestamp` file in each repo. Repos or dirs not having this file will be processed later. You can touch these `.git/commit-timestamp` files in your post-commit script, for example. This allows sorting recently committed repos more cheaply (compared to doing `git log -1`).

`mtime` (or `-mtime`) compares the timestamp or the repo dirs. This might not give the result you want if you expect to process more recently updated repos first, because files in a repo might be updated in the subdirectories of the repo instead of in the top-level dir.

`name` (or `-name`) simply compares the repos' names. This is one of the fastest methods.

`rand` randomizes the order of repos, so you get different ordering in each run.

--source=s*

Directory to check.

Options for subcommand exec

--command=s*

Command to execute.

--exclude-files

Exclude files from processing.

This only applies to `sync_bunch` operations. Operations like `check_bunch` and `exec_bunch` already ignore these and only operate on git repos.

--exclude-non-git-dirs

Exclude non-git dirs from processing.

This only applies to and `sync_bunch` operations. Operations like `check_bunch` and `exec_bunch` already ignore these and only operate on git repos.

--exclude-repos-json=s

Exclude some repos from processing (JSON-encoded).

See --exclude-repos.

--exclude-repos-pat=s

Specify regex pattern of repos to exclude.

--exclude-repos=s@

Exclude some repos from processing.

Can be specified multiple times.

--include-files

Alias for --no-exclude-files.

See --exclude-files.

--include-non-git-dirs

Alias for --no-exclude-non-git-dirs.

See --exclude-non-git-dirs.

--include-repos-json=s

Specific git repos to sync, if not specified all repos in the bunch will be processed (JSON-encoded).

See --include-repos.

--include-repos-pat=s

Specify regex pattern of repos to include.

--include-repos=s@

Specific git repos to sync, if not specified all repos in the bunch will be processed.

Can be specified multiple times.

--repo=s

Only process a single repo.

--sort=s

Order entries in bunch.

Default value:

 "-commit-timestamp"

Valid values:

 ["name","-name","mtime","-mtime","rand","commit-timestamp","-commit-timestamp","db-commit-timestamp","-db-commit-timestamp"]

If sorting is enabled, the repos will be sorted first by some ordering. One use-case for this is to allow more recently committed-to repos to be processed first (using `-commit-timestamp` or `-db-commit-timestamp`).

`db-commit-timestamp` (or `-db-commit-timestamp`) reads SQLite database file `repos.db` in the source directory and to get last commit timestamp information (in the `repos` table, the `commit_timestamp` column). You will need to create and maintain this database, e.g. in your post-commit script. Repos or dirs not having the last commit information in the database will be processed later. This method is faster than `commit-timestamp` (or `-commit-timestamp`, see next paragraph) if your source directory contains lots (e.g. hundreds or thousands) of repos because you avoid having to stat() each `.git/commit-timestamp` file in each repo.

`commit-timestamp` (or `-commit-timestamp`) compares the timestamp of `.git/commit-timestamp` file in each repo. Repos or dirs not having this file will be processed later. You can touch these `.git/commit-timestamp` files in your post-commit script, for example. This allows sorting recently committed repos more cheaply (compared to doing `git log -1`).

`mtime` (or `-mtime`) compares the timestamp or the repo dirs. This might not give the result you want if you expect to process more recently updated repos first, because files in a repo might be updated in the subdirectories of the repo instead of in the top-level dir.

`name` (or `-name`) simply compares the repos' names. This is one of the fastest methods.

`rand` randomizes the order of repos, so you get different ordering in each run.

--source=s*

Directory to check.

Options for subcommand sync

--backup

Whether doing backup to target.

This setting lets you express that you want to perform synchronizing to a backup target, and that you do not do work on the target. Thus, you do not care about uncommitted or untracked files/dirs in the target repos (might happen if you also do periodic copying of repos to backup using cp/rsync). When this setting is turned on, the function will first do a `git clean -f -d` (to delete untracked files/dirs) and then `git checkout .` (to discard all uncommitted changes). This setting will also implicitly turn on `create_bare` setting (unless that setting has been explicitly enabled/disabled).

--create-bare-target, --use-bare

Whether to create bare git repo when target does not exist.

When target repo does not exist, gitbunch can either copy the source repo using `rsync` (the default, if this setting is undefined), or it can create target repo with `git init --bare` (if this setting is set to 1), or it can create target repo with `git init` (if this setting is set to 0).

Bare git repositories contain only contents of the .git folder inside the directory and no working copies of your source files.

Creating bare repos are apt for backup purposes since they are more space-efficient.

Non-repos will still be copied/rsync-ed.

--delete-branch

Whether to delete branches in dest repos not existing in source repos.

--exclude-files

Exclude files from processing.

This only applies to `sync_bunch` operations. Operations like `check_bunch` and `exec_bunch` already ignore these and only operate on git repos.

--exclude-non-git-dirs

Exclude non-git dirs from processing.

This only applies to and `sync_bunch` operations. Operations like `check_bunch` and `exec_bunch` already ignore these and only operate on git repos.

--exclude-repos-json=s

Exclude some repos from processing (JSON-encoded).

See --exclude-repos.

--exclude-repos-pat=s

Specify regex pattern of repos to exclude.

--exclude-repos=s@

Exclude some repos from processing.

Can be specified multiple times.

--include-files

Alias for --no-exclude-files.

See --exclude-files.

--include-non-git-dirs

Alias for --no-exclude-non-git-dirs.

See --exclude-non-git-dirs.

--include-repos-json=s

Specific git repos to sync, if not specified all repos in the bunch will be processed (JSON-encoded).

See --include-repos.

--include-repos-pat=s

Specify regex pattern of repos to include.

--include-repos=s@

Specific git repos to sync, if not specified all repos in the bunch will be processed.

Can be specified multiple times.

--repo=s

Only process a single repo.

--rsync-opt-maintain-ownership

Whether or not, when rsync-ing from source, we use -a (= -rlptgoD) or -rlptD (-a minus -go).

Sometimes using -a results in failure to preserve permission modes on sshfs-mounted filesystem, while -rlptD succeeds, so by default we don't maintain ownership. If you need to maintain ownership (e.g. you run as root and the repos are not owned by root), turn this option on.

--sort=s

Order entries in bunch.

Default value:

 "-commit-timestamp"

Valid values:

 ["name","-name","mtime","-mtime","rand","commit-timestamp","-commit-timestamp","db-commit-timestamp","-db-commit-timestamp"]

If sorting is enabled, the repos will be sorted first by some ordering. One use-case for this is to allow more recently committed-to repos to be processed first (using `-commit-timestamp` or `-db-commit-timestamp`).

`db-commit-timestamp` (or `-db-commit-timestamp`) reads SQLite database file `repos.db` in the source directory and to get last commit timestamp information (in the `repos` table, the `commit_timestamp` column). You will need to create and maintain this database, e.g. in your post-commit script. Repos or dirs not having the last commit information in the database will be processed later. This method is faster than `commit-timestamp` (or `-commit-timestamp`, see next paragraph) if your source directory contains lots (e.g. hundreds or thousands) of repos because you avoid having to stat() each `.git/commit-timestamp` file in each repo.

`commit-timestamp` (or `-commit-timestamp`) compares the timestamp of `.git/commit-timestamp` file in each repo. Repos or dirs not having this file will be processed later. You can touch these `.git/commit-timestamp` files in your post-commit script, for example. This allows sorting recently committed repos more cheaply (compared to doing `git log -1`).

`mtime` (or `-mtime`) compares the timestamp or the repo dirs. This might not give the result you want if you expect to process more recently updated repos first, because files in a repo might be updated in the subdirectories of the repo instead of in the top-level dir.

`name` (or `-name`) simply compares the repos' names. This is one of the fastest methods.

`rand` randomizes the order of repos, so you get different ordering in each run.

--source=s*

Directory to check.

--target=s*

Destination bunch.

COMPLETION ^

This script has shell tab completion capability with support for several shells.

bash

To activate bash completion for this script, put:

 complete -C gitbunch gitbunch

in your bash startup (e.g. ~/.bashrc). Your next shell session will then recognize tab completion for the command. Or, you can also directly execute the line above in your shell to activate immediately.

It is recommended, however, that you install shcompgen which allows you to activate completion scripts for several kinds of scripts on multiple shells. Some CPAN distributions (those that are built with Dist::Zilla::Plugin::GenShellCompletion) will even automatically enable shell completion for their included scripts (using shcompgen) at installation time, so you can immadiately have tab completion.

tcsh

To activate tcsh completion for this script, put:

 complete gitbunch 'p/*/`gitbunch`/'

in your tcsh startup (e.g. ~/.tcshrc). Your next shell session will then recognize tab completion for the command. Or, you can also directly execute the line above in your shell to activate immediately.

It is also recommended to install shcompgen (see above).

other shells

For fish and zsh, install shcompgen as described above.

ENVIRONMENT ^

GITBUNCH_OPT => str

Specify additional command-line options

CONFIGURATION FILE ^

This script can read configuration file, which by default is searched at ~/.config/gitbunch.conf, ~/gitbunch.conf or /etc/gitbunch.conf (can be changed by specifying --config-path). All found files will be read and merged.

To disable searching for configuration files, pass --no-config.

Configuration file is in the format of IOD, which is basically INI with some extra features. Section names map to subcommand names.

You can put multiple profiles in a single file by using section names like [profile=SOMENAME] or [SUBCOMMAND_NAME profile=SOMENAME]. Those sections will only be read if you specify the matching --config-profile SOMENAME.

List of available configuration parameters:

Common for all subcommands

 format (see --format)
 log_level (see --log-level)
 naked_res (see --naked-res)

For subcommand 'check'

 exclude_files (see --exclude-files)
 exclude_non_git_dirs (see --exclude-non-git-dirs)
 exclude_repos (see --exclude-repos)
 exclude_repos_pat (see --exclude-repos-pat)
 include_repos (see --include-repos)
 include_repos_pat (see --include-repos-pat)
 repo (see --repo)
 sort (see --sort)
 source (see --source)

For subcommand 'exec'

 command (see --command)
 exclude_files (see --exclude-files)
 exclude_non_git_dirs (see --exclude-non-git-dirs)
 exclude_repos (see --exclude-repos)
 exclude_repos_pat (see --exclude-repos-pat)
 include_repos (see --include-repos)
 include_repos_pat (see --include-repos-pat)
 repo (see --repo)
 sort (see --sort)
 source (see --source)

For subcommand 'sync'

 backup (see --backup)
 create_bare_target (see --create-bare-target)
 delete_branch (see --delete-branch)
 exclude_files (see --exclude-files)
 exclude_non_git_dirs (see --exclude-non-git-dirs)
 exclude_repos (see --exclude-repos)
 exclude_repos_pat (see --exclude-repos-pat)
 include_repos (see --include-repos)
 include_repos_pat (see --include-repos-pat)
 repo (see --repo)
 rsync_opt_maintain_ownership (see --rsync-opt-maintain-ownership)
 sort (see --sort)
 source (see --source)
 target (see --target)

FILES ^

~/.config/gitbunch.conf

~/gitbunch.conf

/etc/gitbunch.conf

HOMEPAGE ^

Please visit the project's homepage at https://metacpan.org/release/Git-Bunch.

SOURCE ^

Source repository is at https://github.com/perlancar/perl-Git-Bunch.

BUGS ^

Please report any bugs or feature requests on the bugtracker website https://rt.cpan.org/Public/Dist/Display.html?Name=Git-Bunch

When submitting a bug or request, please include a test-file or a patch to an existing test-file that illustrates the bug or desired feature.

AUTHOR ^

perlancar <perlancar@cpan.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

This software is copyright (c) 2015 by perlancar@cpan.org.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.

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