Daniel Muey > Locale-Maketext-Utils > Locale::Maketext::Utils::Phrase::Norm::NonBytesStr

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Normalization ^

We only want bytes strings and not “wide” unicode code point notation.

Rationale

This helps give consistency, clarity, and simplicity.

Solution: You can simply use the character itself or a bracket notation method for the handful of markup related or visually special characters

possible violations ^

If you get false positives then that only goes to help highlight how ambiguity adds to the reason to avoid non-bytes strings!

Note that HTML Entities are not addressed here since the unicode notation as well as other syntax is covered via Ampersand.

non-bytes string (perl)'

This means you have something like \x{NNNN} and need to use the character itself instead.

These will be turned into ‘[comment,non bytes unicode string “\x{NNNN}”]’ (where NNNN is the Unicode code point) so you can find them visually.

charnames.pm string notation

This means you have something like \N{…} and need to use the character itself instead.

These will be turned into ‘[comment,charnames.pm type string “\N{…}”]’ so you can find them visually.

unicode code point notation (C/C++/Java style)'

This means you have something like \uNNNN and need to use the character itself instead.

These will be turned into ‘[comment,unicode notation “\uNNNN”]’ (where NNNN is the Unicode code point) so you can find them visually.

unicode code point notation (alternate style)

This means you have something like U'NNNN' and need to use the character itself instead.

These will be turned into ‘[comment,unicode notation “U'NNNN'”]’ (where NNNN is the Unicode code point) so you can find them visually.

unicode code point notation (visual notation style)'

This means you have something like U+NNNN and need to use the character itself instead.

These will be turned into ‘[comment,non bytes unicode string “U+NNNN]’ (where NNNN is the Unicode code point) so you can find them visually.

unicode code point notation (visual notation type 2 style)'

This means you have something like UxNNNN and need to use the character itself instead.

These will be turned into ‘[comment,non bytes unicode string “UxNNNN]’ (where NNNN is the Unicode code point) so you can find them visually.

unicode code point notation (Python style)

This means you have something like u"\uNNNN" and need to use the character itself instead.

These will be turned into ‘[comment,non bytes unicode string “u"\uNNNN"”]’ (where NNNN is the Unicode code point) so you can find them visually.

possible warnings ^

None

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