Kevin Ryde > Math-PlanePath > Math::PlanePath::UlamWarburtonQuarter

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NAME ^

Math::PlanePath::UlamWarburtonQuarter -- growth of a 2-D cellular automaton

SYNOPSIS ^

 use Math::PlanePath::UlamWarburtonQuarter;
 my $path = Math::PlanePath::UlamWarburtonQuarter->new;
 my ($x, $y) = $path->n_to_xy (123);

DESCRIPTION ^

This is the pattern of a cellular automaton studied by Ulam and Warburton, confined to a quarter of the plane and oriented diagonally. Cells are numbered by growth tree row and anti-clockwise within the row.

    14 |  81    80    79    78    75    74    73    72
    13 |     57          56          55          54
    12 |  82    48    47    77    76    46    45    71
    11 |           40                      39
    10 |  83    49    36    35    34    33    44    70
     9 |     58          28          27          53
     8 |  84    85    37    25    24    32    68    69
     7 |                       22
     6 |  20    19    18    17    23    31    67    66
     5 |     12          11          26          52
     4 |  21     9     8    16    29    30    43    65
     3 |            6                      38
     2 |   5     4     7    15    59    41    42    64
     1 |      2          10          50          51
    Y=0|   1     3    13    14    60    61    62    63
       +----------------------------------------------
         X=0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14

The growth rule is a given cell grows diagonally NE, NW, SE and SW, but only if the new cell has no neighbours and is within the first quadrant. So the initial cell "a" is N=1,

    |
    | a                    initial cell, depth=0
    +----

It's confined to the first quadrant so can only grow NE as "b",

    |   b
    | a                    "b" depth=1
    +------

Then the next row "c" cells can go in three directions SE, NE, NW. These cells are numbered anti-clockwise around from the SE as N=3,N=4,N=5.

    | c   c
    |   b
    | a   c                "c" depth=2
    +---------

The "d" cell is then only a single on the leading diagonal, since the other diagonals all already have neighbours (the existing "c" cells).

    |       d
    | c   c                depth=3
    |   b
    | a   c
    +---------

    |     e   e
    |       d
    | c   c   e            depth=4
    |   b
    | a   c
    +-----------

    |   f       f
    |     e   e
    |       d
    | c   c   e            depth=5
    |   b       f
    | a   c
    +-------------

    | g   g   g   g
    |   f       f
    | g   e   e   g
    |       d
    | c   c   e   g        depth=6
    |   b       f
    | a   c   g   g
    +-------------

In general the pattern always always grows by 1 along the X=Y leading diagonal. The point on that diagonal is the middle of row depth=X. The pattern expands into the sides with a self-similar diamond shaped pattern filling 6 of 16 cells in any 4x4 square block.

Tree Row Ranges

Counting depth=0 as the N=1 at the origin, depth=1 as the next N=2, etc, the number of new cells added in the tree row is

    rowwidth(depth) = 3^(count_1_bits(depth+1) - 1)

So depth=0 has 3^(1-1)=1 cells, as does depth=1 which is N=2. Then depth=2 has 3^(2-1)=3 cells N=3,N=4,N=5 because depth+1=3=0b11 has two 1 bits in binary. The N row start and end is the cumulative total of those before it,

    Ndepth(depth) = 1 + rowwidth(0) + ... + rowwidth(depth-1)

    Nend(depth) = rowwidth(0) + ... + rowwidth(depth)

For example depth=2 ends at N=(1+1+3)=5.

    depth    Ndepth    rowwidth      Nend
      0          1         1           1
      1          2         1           2
      2          3         3           5
      3          6         1           6
      4          7         3           9
      5         10         3          12
      6         13         9          21
      7         22         1          22
      8         23         3          25

At row depth+1 = power-of-2 the Ndepth sum is

    Ndepth(depth) = 1 + (4^a-1)/3       for depth+1 = 2^a

For example depth=3 is depth+1=2^2 starts at N=1+(4^2-1)/3=6, or depth=7 is depth+1=2^3 starts N=1+(4^3-1)/3=22.

Further bits in the depth+1 contribute powers-of-4 with a tripling for each bit above it. So if depth+1 has bits a,b,c,d,etc from high to low then

    depth+1 = 2^a + 2^b + 2^c + 2^d ...       a>b>c>d...
    Ndepth = 1 + (-1
                  +       4^a
                  +   3 * 4^b
                  + 3^2 * 4^c
                  + 3^3 * 4^d + ...) / 3

For example depth=5 is depth+1=6 = 2^2+2^1 is Ndepth = 1+(4^2-1)/3 + 4^1 = 10. Or depth=6 is depth+1=7 = 2^2+2^1+2^0 is Ndepth = 1+(4^2-1)/3 + 4^1 + 3*4^0 = 13.

Self-Similar Replication

The square shape growth to depth=2^level-2 repeats the pattern to the preceding depth=2^(level-1)-2 three times. For example,

    |  d   d   c   c             depth=6 = 2^3-2
    |    d       c               triplicates
    |  d   d   c   c             depth=2 = 2^2-2
    |        *
    |  a   a   b   b
    |    a       b
    |  a   a   b   b
    +--------------------

The 3x3 square "a" repeats, pointing SE, NE and NW as "b", "c" and "d". This resulting 7x7 square then likewise repeats. The points in the path here are numbered by tree rows rather than by this sort of replication, but the replication helps to see the structure of the pattern.

Octant

Option parts => 'octant' confines the pattern to the first eighth of the plane 0<=Y<=X.

    parts => "octant"

     14 |                                           50
     13 |                                        36
     12 |                                     31    49
     11 |                                  26
     10 |                               24    30    48
      9 |                            19          35
      8 |                         17    23    46    47
      7 |                      15
      6 |                   14    16    22    45    44
      5 |                 9          18          34
      4 |              7    13    20    21    29    43
      3 |           5                      25
      2 |        4     6    12    37    27    28    42
      1 |     2           8          32          33
    Y=0 |  1     3    10    11    38    39    40    41
        +-------------------------------------------------
         X=0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15

In this arrangement N=1,2,4,5,7,etc on the leading diagonal is the last N of each row (tree_depth_to_n_end()).

Upper Octant

Option parts => 'octant_up' confines the pattern to the upper octant 0<=X<=Y of the first quadrant.

    parts => "octant_up"

     14 | 46    45    44    43    40    39    38    37
     13 |    35          34          33          32
     12 | 47    30    29    42    41    28    27
     11 |          26                      25
     10 | 48    31    23    22    21    20
      9 |    36          19          18
      8 | 49    50    24    17    16
      7 |                      15
      6 | 13    12    11    10
      5 |     9           8
      4 | 14     7     6
      3 |           5
      2 |  4     3
      1 |     2
    Y=0 |  1
        +----------------------------------------------
          X=0 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14

In this arrangement N=1,2,3,5,6,etc on the leading diagonal is the first N of each row (tree_depth_to_n()).

N Start

The default is to number points starting N=1 as shown above. An optional n_start can give a different start, in the same pattern. For example to start at 0,

    n_start => 0

     7 |                      21
     6 | 19    18    17    16
     5 |    11          10
     4 | 20     8     7    15
     3 |           5
     2 |  4     3     6    14
     1 |     1           9
    Y=0|  0     2    12    13
       +-------------------------
        X=0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7

FUNCTIONS ^

See "FUNCTIONS" in Math::PlanePath for behaviour common to all path classes.

$path = Math::PlanePath::UlamWarburtonQuarter->new ()
$path = Math::PlanePath::UlamWarburtonQuarter->new (parts => $str, n_start => $n)

Create and return a new path object. parts can be

    1              first quadrant, the default
    "octant"       first eighth
    "octant_up"    upper eighth

Tree Methods

@n_children = $path->tree_n_children($n)

Return the children of $n, or an empty list if $n has no children (including when $n < 1, ie. before the start of the path).

The children are the cells turned on adjacent to $n at the next row. The way points are numbered means that when there's multiple children they're consecutive N values, for example at N=12 the children 19,20,21.

$n_parent = $path->tree_n_parent($n)

Return the parent node of $n, or undef if $n <= 1 (the start of the path).

Tree Descriptive Methods

@nums = $path->tree_num_children_list()

Return a list of the possible number of children at the nodes of $path. This is the set of possible return values from tree_n_num_children().

    parts        tree_num_children_list()
    -----        ------------------------
      1              0, 1,    3
    octant           0, 1, 2, 3
    octant_up        0, 1, 2, 3

The octant forms have 2 children when branching from the leading diagonal, otherwise 0,1,3.

Level Methods

($n_lo, $n_hi) = $path->level_to_n_range($level)

Return ($n_start, tree_depth_to_n_end(2**($level+1) - 2)).

OEIS ^

Entries in Sloane's Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences related to this path includes

http://oeis.org/A151920 (etc)

    parts=1  (the default)
      A147610   num cells in row, tree_depth_to_width()
      A151920   total cells to depth, tree_depth_to_n_end()

    parts=octant,octant_up
      A079318   num cells in row, tree_depth_to_width()

SEE ALSO ^

Math::PlanePath, Math::PlanePath::UlamWarburton, Math::PlanePath::LCornerTree, Math::PlanePath::CellularRule

Math::PlanePath::SierpinskiTriangle (a similar binary ones-count related calculation)

HOME PAGE ^

http://user42.tuxfamily.org/math-planepath/index.html

LICENSE ^

Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 Kevin Ryde

This file is part of Math-PlanePath.

Math-PlanePath is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 3, or (at your option) any later version.

Math-PlanePath is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with Math-PlanePath. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

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