Piotr Roszatycki > POSIX-strftime-GNU > POSIX::strftime::GNU

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Module Version: 0.0304   Source  

NAME ^

POSIX::strftime::GNU - strftime with GNU extensions

SYNOPSIS ^

  use POSIX::strftime::GNU;
  use POSIX 'strftime';
  print POSIX::strftime('%a, %d %b %Y %T %z', localtime);

command line:

  C:\> set PERL_ANYEVENT_LOG=filter=debug
  C:\> perl -MPOSIX::strftime::GNU -MAnyEvent -e "AE::cv->send"

DESCRIPTION ^

This is a wrapper for POSIX::strftime which implements more character sequences compatible with GNU systems.

The module is 100% compatible with format of date(1) command from GNU coreutils package.

It can be helpful if you run some software on operating system where these extensions, especially %z sequence, are not supported, i.e. on Microsoft Windows. On such system some software can work incorrectly, i.e. logging for Plack and AnyEvent modules might be broken.

Even GNU C Library's strftime(3) function does not provide 100% compatibility with date(1) command so this module can be useful also on Linux.

The XS module is used if compiler is available and can module can be loaded. The XS is mandatory if PERL_POSIX_STRFTIME_GNU_XS environment variable is true.

The PP module is used when XS module can not be loaded or PERL_POSIX_STRFTIME_GNU_PP environment variable is true.

None of these modules are loaded if both PERL_POSIX_STRFTIME_GNU_PP and PERL_POSIX_STRFTIME_GNU_XS environment variables are defined and false.

FUNCTIONS ^

strftime

  $str = strftime($format, @time)

This is replacement for POSIX::strftime function.

The nanoseconds can be given as a fraction of seconds.

  use POSIX::strftime::GNU;
  use Time::HiRes qw(gettimeofday);
  my ($t, $nsec) = gettimeofday;
  my @t = localtime $t;
  $t[0] += $nsec / 10e5;
  print strftime('%N', @t);

FORMAT ^

The format argument is composed of zero or more conversion specifications. Each conversion specification is composed of a % (percent) character followed by one or two conversion characters which specify the replacement required.

There are some extensions of ANSI C (unmarked): those given in the Single UNIX Specification (marked SU), those given in Olson's timezone package (marked TZ), and those given in glibc (marked GNU).

The following conversion specifications are supported:

%a

The abbreviated weekday name according to the current locale.

%A

The full weekday name according to the current locale.

%b

The abbreviated month name according to the current locale.

%B

The full month name according to the current locale.

%c

The preferred date and time representation for the current locale.

%C

The century number (year/100) as a 2-digit integer. (SU)

%d

The day of the month as a decimal number (range 01 to 31).

%D

Equivalent to %m/%d/%y. (for Americans only: Americans should note that in other countries %d/%m/%y is rather common. This means that in international context this format is ambiguous and should not be used.) (SU)

%e

Like %d, the day of the month as a decimal number, but a leading zero is replaced by a space. (SU)

%E

Modifier: use alternative format, see below. (SU)

%F

Equivalent to %Y-%m-%d (the ISO 8601 date format). (C99)

%G

The ISO 8601 week-based year (see NOTES) with century as a decimal number. The 4-digit year corresponding to the ISO week number (see %V). This has the same format and value as %Y, except that if the ISO week number belongs to the previous or next year, that year is used instead. (TZ)

%g

Like %G, but without century, that is, with a 2-digit year (00-99). (TZ)

%h

Equivalent to %b. (SU)

%H

The hour as a decimal number using a 24-hour clock (range 00 to 23).

%I

The hour as a decimal number using a 12-hour clock (range 01 to 12).

%j

The day of the year as a decimal number (range 001 to 366).

%k

The hour (24-hour clock) as a decimal number (range 0 to 23); single digits are preceded by a blank. (See also %H.) (TZ)

%l

The hour (12-hour clock) as a decimal number (range 1 to 12); single digits are preceded by a blank. (See also %I.) (TZ)

%m

The month as a decimal number (range 01 to 12).

%M

The minute as a decimal number (range 00 to 59).

%n

A newline character. (SU)

%N

Nanoseconds (range 000000000 to 999999999). It is a non-POSIX extension and outputs a nanoseconds if there is floating seconds argument.

%O

Modifier: use alternative format, see below. (SU)

%p

Either "AM" or "PM" according to the given time value, or the corresponding strings for the current locale. Noon is treated as "PM" and midnight as "AM".

%P

Like %p but in lowercase: "am" or "pm" or a corresponding string for the current locale. (GNU)

%r

The time in a.m. or p.m. notation. In the POSIX locale this is equivalent to %I:%M:%S %p. (SU)

%R

The time in 24-hour notation (%H:%M). (SU) For a version including the seconds, see %T below.

%s

The number of seconds since the Epoch, 1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000 (UTC). (TZ)

%S

The second as a decimal number (range 00 to 60). (The range is up to 60 to allow for occasional leap seconds.)

%t

A tab character. (SU)

%T

The time in 24-hour notation (%H:%M:%S). (SU)

%u

The day of the week as a decimal, range 1 to 7, Monday being 1. See also %w. (SU)

%U

The week number of the current year as a decimal number, range 00 to 53, starting with the first Sunday as the first day of week 01. See also %V and %W.

%V

The ISO 8601 week number (see NOTES) of the current year as a decimal number, range 01 to 53, where week 1 is the first week that has at least 4 days in the new year. See also %U and %W. (SU)

%w

The day of the week as a decimal, range 0 to 6, Sunday being 0. See also %u.

%W

The week number of the current year as a decimal number, range 00 to 53, starting with the first Monday as the first day of week 01.

%x

The preferred date representation for the current locale without the time.

%X

The preferred time representation for the current locale without the date.

%y

The year as a decimal number without a century (range 00 to 99).

%Y

The year as a decimal number including the century.

%z

The +hhmm or -hhmm numeric timezone (that is, the hour and minute offset from UTC). (SU)

%Z

The timezone or name or abbreviation.

%+

The date and time in date(1) format. (TZ) (Not supported in glibc2.)

%%

A literal % character.

Some conversion specifications can be modified by preceding the conversion specifier character by the E or O modifier to indicate that an alternative format should be used. If the alternative format or specification does not exist for the current locale, the behavior will be as if the unmodified conversion specification were used. (SU) The Single UNIX Specification mentions %Ec, %EC, %Ex, %EX, %Ey, %EY, %Od, %Oe, %OH, %OI, %Om, %OM, %OS, %Ou, %OU, %OV, %Ow, %OW, %Oy, where the effect of the O modifier is to use alternative numeric symbols (say, roman numerals), and that of the E modifier is to use a locale-dependent alternative representation.

%G, %g, and %V yield values calculated from the week-based year defined by the ISO 8601 standard. In this system, weeks start on a Monday, and are numbered from 01, for the first week, up to 52 or 53, for the last week. Week 1 is the first week where four or more days fall within the new year (or, synonymously, week 01 is: the first week of the year that contains a Thursday; or, the week that has 4 January in it). When three of fewer days of the first calendar week of the new year fall within that year, then the ISO 8601 week-based system counts those days as part of week 53 of the preceding year. For example, 1 January 2010 is a Friday, meaning that just three days of that calendar week fall in 2010. Thus, the ISO 8601 week- based system considers these days to be part of week 53 (%V) of the year 2009 (%G) ; week 01 of ISO 8601 year 2010 starts on Monday, 4 January 2010.

Glibc provides some extensions for conversion specifications. (These extensions are not specified in POSIX.1-2001, but a few other systems provide similar features.) Between the % character and the conversion specifier character, an optional flag and field width may be specified. (These precede the E or O modifiers, if present.)

The following flag characters are permitted:

_

(underscore) Pad a numeric result string with spaces.

-

(dash) Do not pad a numeric result string.

0

Pad a numeric result string with zeros even if the conversion specifier character uses space-padding by default.

^

Convert alphabetic characters in result string to upper case.

#

Swap the case of the result string. (This flag only works with certain conversion specifier characters, and of these, it is only really useful with %Z.)

INSTALLING ^

Cygwin

This module requires libcrypt-devel package.

BUGS ^

Timezone name is guessed with several heuristics so it can differ from timezone name returned by date(1) command.

If you find the bug or want to implement new features, please report it at https://github.com/dex4er/perl-POSIX-strftime-GNU/issues

The code repository is available at http://github.com/dex4er/perl-POSIX-strftime-GNU

AUTHOR ^

Piotr Roszatycki <dexter@cpan.org>

LICENSE ^

Copyright (c) 2012-2014 Piotr Roszatycki <dexter@cpan.org>.

Format specification is based on strftime(3) manual page which is a part of the Linux man-pages project.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as perl itself.

See http://dev.perl.org/licenses/artistic.html

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