Kenichi Ishigaki > Path-Extended > Path::Extended::File

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NAME ^

Path::Extended::File

SYNOPSIS ^

  use Path::Extended::File;
  my $file = Path::Extended::File->new('path/to/file');

  # you can get information of the file
  print $file->basename;  # file
  print $file->absolute;  # /absolute/path/to/file

  # you can get an object for the parent directory
  my $parent_dir = $file->parent;

  # Path::Extended::File object works like an IO handle
  $file->openr;
  my $first_line = $file->getline;
  print <$file>;
  close $file;

  # it also can do some extra file related tasks
  $file->copy_to('/other/path/to/file');
  $file->unlink if $file->exists;

  $file->slurp(chomp => 1, callback => sub {
    my $line = shift;
    print $line, "\n" unless substr($line, 0, 1) eq '#';
  });

  file('/path/to/other_file')->save(\@lines, { mkdir => 1 });

  # it has a logger, too
  $file->log( fatal => "Couldn't open $file: $!" );

DESCRIPTION ^

This class implements file-specific methods. Most of them are simple wrappers of the equivalents from various File::* or IO::* classes. See also Path::Class::Entity for common methods like copy and move.

METHODS ^

new

takes a path or parts of a path of a file, and creates a Path::Extended::File object. If the path specified is a relative one, it will be converted to the absolute one internally. Note that this doesn't open a file even when you pass an extra file mode (which will be considered as a part of the file name).

basename

returns a base name of the file via File::Basename::basename.

open

opens the file with a specified mode, and returns the $self object to chain methods, or undef if there's anything wrong (the handle opened is stored internally). You can use characters like "r" and "w", or symbols like "<" and ">". If you want to specify IO layers, use the latter format (e.g. "<:raw"). If the file is already open, it closes at first and opens again.

openr, openw

These are shortcuts for ->open("r") and ->open("w") respectively.

sysopen

takes the third (and the fourth if necessary) arguments (i.e. mode and permission) of the native sysopen, and opens the file, and returns the $self object, or undef if there's anything wrong. The handle opened is stored internally.

binmode

may take an argument (to specify I/O layers), and arranges for the stored file handle to handle binary data properly. No effect if the file is not open.

close

closes the stored file handle and removes it from the object. No effect if the file is not open.

print, printf, say, getline, getlines, read, sysread, write, syswrite, autoflush, flush, printflush, getc, ungetc, truncate, blocking, eof, fileno, error, sync, fcntl, ioctl

are simple wrappers of the equivalents of IO::Handle. No effect if the file is not open.

lock_ex, lock_sh

locks the stored file handle with flock. No effect if the file is not open.

seek, sysseek, tell

are simple wrappers of the equirvalent built-in functions. Note that Path::Extended doesn't export constants like SEEK_SET, SEEK_CUR, SEEK_END.

mtime

returns a mtime of the file/directory. If you pass an argument, you can change the mtime of the file/directory.

size

returns a size of the file/directory.

remove

unlink the file.

slurp

may take a hash (or a hash referernce) option, then opens the file, does various things for each line with callbacks if necessary, and returns an array of the lines (list context), or the concatenated string (scalar context).

Options are:

binmode

arranges for the file handle to read binary data properly if set to true.

chomp

chomps the end-of-lines if set to true.

decode

decodes the lines with the specified encoding.

callback

does arbitrary things through the specified code reference.

filter

slurp usually returns all the (processed) lines. With this option (which should be a string or a regex), slurp returns only the lines that match the filter rule.

ignore_return_value

slurp usually stores everything on memory, but sometimes you don't need a return value (especially when you do something with a callback). If this is set to true, slurp doesn't store lines on memory. Note that if you use slurp in the void context, this will be set to true internally.

grep

  my @found = $file->grep('string or regex', ...);

save

takes a string or an array reference of lines, and an optional hash (or a hash reference), then opens the file, does various things for each line (or the entire string) with callbacks if necessary, and saves the content to the file, and returns the $self object or undef if there's anything wrong.

Options are:

mkdir

creates a parent directory if necessary.

mode, append

takes a mode specification ("w", "a", or equivalent symbols). The default is a write mode, and if you set append option to true, it will be changed to a append mode.

lock

locks exclusively while writing.

binmode

arranges for the file handle to write binary data properly.

encode

encodes the lines (or the entire string) with the specified encoding.

callback

does arbitrary things through the specified code reference.

mtime

changes the last modified time to the specified time.

touch

changes file access and modification times, or creates a blank file when it doesn't exist.

AUTHOR ^

Kenichi Ishigaki, <ishigaki@cpan.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

Copyright (C) 2008 by Kenichi Ishigaki.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

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