Adrian Witas > Test-DBUnit > Test::DBUnit

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NAME ^

Test::DBUnit - Database testing framework.

SYNOPSIS ^

    use DBIx::Connection;

    use Test::DBUnit connection_name => 'test';
    use Test::More tests => $tests;

    DBIx::Connection->new(
        name     => 'test',
        dsn      => $ENV{DB_TEST_CONNECTION},
        username => $ENV{DB_TEST_USERNAME},
        password => $ENV{DB_TEST_PASSWORD},
    );

    #or

    use Test::DBUnit;
    use Test::More tests => $tests;
    use DBI;

    my $dbh = DBI->connect(...);
    add_test_connection('test', $dbh)

    #or

    use Test::More;
    use Test::DBUnit dsn => 'dbi:Oracle:localhost:1521/ORACLE_INSTANCE', username => 'user', password => 'password';
    plan tests => $tests;

    my $connection = test_connection();
    my $dbh = test_dbh();

    reset_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema.sql');

    populate_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema.sql');

    xml_dataset_ok('test1');

    #you database operations here
    $connection->execute_statement("UPDATE ....");

    expected_xml_dataset_ok('test1');

    #or

    reset_sequence_ok('table1_seq1');

    dataset_ok(
        table1 => [column1 => 'x', column2 => 'y'],
        table1 => [column1 => 'x1_X', column2 => 'y1_X'],
        ...
        table2 => [column1 => 'x2, column2 => 'y2'],
        table2 => [column1 => 'x1_N', column2 => 'y1_N'],
    );

    #you database operations here
    $connection->execute_statement("UPDATE ....");

    expected_dataset_ok(
        table1 => [column1 => 'z', column2 => 'y'],
    )

    has_table('table1');
    has_columns('table1', [
    'column1', 'column2'
    ]);

    
    column_is_null('table1', 'column1');
    column_is_not_null('table1', 'columne2');
    column_type_is('table1', 'column1', 'varchar(20)');
    has_pk('table1', 'id');
    has_fk('table2', 'tab1_id', 'table1');
    has_index('table1', 'tab1_idx1', 'column1');
    index_is_unique('table1', tab_idx1');
    index_is_primary('tabl1', 'tab_idx_pk');
    index_is_type('tabl1', 'tab_idx_pk', 'btree');

    has_routine('approve_document', ['IN varchar', 'RETURN record']);

DESCRIPTION ^

Database testing framework that covers both black-box testing and clear-box(white-box) testing.

Black-box testing allows you to verify that your database data match expected set of values. This dataset comes either from tables, views, stored procedure/functions.

Clear-box testing focuses on existence database schema elements like tables, views, columns, indexes, triggers, procedures, functions, constraints. Additionally you can test particular characteristic of those object like type, default value, is unique, exceptions etc .

Managing test data

Database tests should giving you complete and fine grained control over the test data that is used.

    use Test::DBUnit dsn => $dsn, username => $username, password => $password;
    reset_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema.sql');
    populate_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema.sql');
    reset_sequence_ok('emp_seq');

Loading test data sets

Before you want to test your business logic it is essential to have repeatable snapshot of the data to be tested, so this module allows you fill in/synchronize your database with the testing data.

    dataset_ok(
        emp => [ename => "john", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp => [ename => "scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        bonus => [ename => "scott", job => "project manager", sal => "20"],
    );
    or
    xml_dataset_ok('test1');
    t/test_unit.test1.xml #given that you testing module is t/test_unit.t
    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
    <dataset load_strategy="INSERT_LOAD_STRATEGY">
        <emp empno="1" ename="scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
        <emp empno="2" ename="john"  deptno="10" job="engineer" />
        <bonus ename="scott" job="project manager" sal="20" />
    </dataset>

You may automatically create testing dataset or expected dataset using Test::DBUnit::Generator module.

Getting connection to test database

    my $connection = test_connection();
    #business logic that change tested data comes here
    ....

Verifying test results

It can be useful to use data sets for checking the contents of a database after is has been modified by a test. You may want to check the result of a update/insert/delete method or a stored procedure.

    expected_dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => "1", ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp   => [empno => "2", ename => "John",  deptno => "10", job => "engineer"],
        emp   => [empno => "3", ename => "Mark",  deptno => "10", job => "sales assistant"],
        bonus => [ename => "scott", job => "project manager", sal => "20"],
    );
    
    expected_dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => "1", ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp   => [empno => "2", ename => "John",  deptno => "10", job => "engineer"],
        emp   => [empno => "3", ename => "Mark",  deptno => "10", job => "sales assistant"],
        bonus => [ename => "scott", job => "project manager", sal => "20"],
        $description
    );
    
    or

    expected_xml_dataset_ok('test1');
    t/test_unit.test1-result.xml #given that you testing module is t/test_unit.t

    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
    <dataset>
        <emp empno="1" ename="Scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
        <emp empno="2" ename="John"  deptno="10" job="engineer" />
        <emp empno="3" ename="Mark"  deptno="10" job="sales assistant" />
        <bonus ename="scott" job="project manager" sal="20" />
    </dataset>

Dynamic tests

You may want to check not just a particular value but range of values or perform complex condition against database column's value, so that you can use callback.

    expected_dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => "1", ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp   => [empno => "2", ename => "John",  deptno => "10", job => "engineer"],
        emp   => [empno => "3", ename => "Mark",  deptno => "10",
            job => sub {
                my $value = shift;
                !! ($value =~ /sales assistant/i);
            }
        ],
        bonus => [ename => "scott", job => "project manager", sal => "20"],
    );

    expected_dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => "1", ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp   => [empno => "2", ename => "John",  deptno => "10", job => "engineer"],
        emp   => [empno => "3", ename => "Mark",  deptno => "10",
            job => sub {
                my $value = shift;
                !! ($value =~ /sales assistant/i);
            }
        ],
        bonus => [ename => "scott", job => "project manager", sal => "20"],
        $description
    );

    or

    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
    <dataset >
        <emp empno="1" ename="Scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
        <emp empno="2" ename="John"  deptno="10" job="engineer" />
        <emp empno="3" ename="Mark"  deptno="10" >
            <job><![CDATA[
                my $val = shift;
                !! ($val eq "sales assistant");
            ]]><job>
        <bonus ename="scott" job="project manager" sal="20" />
    </dataset>

Configuring the dataset load strategy

By default, datasets are loaded into the database using an insert load strategy. This means that all data in the tables that are present in the dataset is deleted, after which the test data records are inserted. Order in with all data is deleted depends on reverse table occurrence in the dataset, however you may force order of data by specifying empty table:

        table1 => [],  #this fore delete operation in occurrence order
        table1 => [col1 => 1, col2 => 'some data'],    
        or in xml file
        <table1 />
        <table1 col1="1" col2="some data"/>

In this strategy number of rows will be validated against datasets in (xml_)expexted_dataset_ok method. Load strategy behavior is configurable, it can be modified by calling:

    set_insert_load_strategy();
    or in XML
    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
    <dataset load_strategy="INSERT_LOAD_STRATEGY">
        <emp empno="1" ename="Scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
        ....
    </dataset>

    set_refresh_load_strategy();
    or in XML

    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
    <dataset load_strategy="REFRESH_LOAD_STRATEGY">
        <emp empno="1" ename="Scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
    </dataset>

The alternative to the insert load strategy is refresh load strategy. In this case update on existing rows will take place or insert occurs if rows are missing.

Tests with multiple database instances.

You may need to test data from more then one database instance, so that you have to specify connection against which tests will be performed either by adding prefix to test methods, or by setting explicit test connection context.

    use Test::DBUnit connection_names => ['my_connection_1', 'my_connection_2'];
    my $dbh = DBI->connect($dsn_1, $username, $password);
    
    add_test_connection('my_connection_1', dbh => $dbh);
    # or
     my $connection = DBIx::Connection->new(
        name     => 'my_connection_2',
        dsn      => $dsn_2,
        username => $username,
        password => $password,
    );
    add_test_connection($connection);


    #set connection context by prefix
    my_connection_1_reset_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema_1.sql');
    my_connection_1_populate_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema_1.sql');

    my_connection_2_xml_dataset_ok('test1');
    ...
    my_connection_2_expected_xml_dataset_ok('test1');


    #set connection context explicitly.
    set_test_connection('my_connection_2');
    reset_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema_2.sql');
    populate_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema_2.sql');
    xml_dataset_ok('test1');

    expected_xml_dataset_ok('test1');

Working with sequences

You may use sequences or auto generated features, so this module allows you handle that.

    reset_sequence_ok('emp_seq');
    or for MySQL
    reset_sequence_ok('test_table_name')

The ALTER TABLE test_table_name AUTO_INCREMENT = 1 will be issued Note that for MySQL reset sequence the test_table_name must be empty.

    or in XML
    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
    <dataset reset_sequences="emp_seq, dept_seq">
        <emp empno="1" ename="Scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
        ....
    </dataset>

Sequence tests with Oracle

    t/sql/create_schema.sql
    CREATE SEQUENCE emp_seq;
    CREATE TABLE emp(
     empno      NUMBER NOT NULL,
     ename      VARCHAR2(10),
     job        VARCHAR2(20),
     mgr        NUMBER(4),
     hiredate   DATE,
     sal        NUMBER(7,2),
     comm       NUMBER(7,2),
     deptno     NUMBER(2),
     CONSTRAINT emp_pk PRIMARY KEY(empno),
     FOREIGN KEY (deptno) REFERENCES dept (deptno) 
    );
    CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER emp_autogen
    BEFORE INSERT ON emp FOR EACH ROW
    BEGIN
        IF :new.empno is null then
            SELECT emp_seq.nextval INTO :new.empno FROM dual;
        END IF;
    END;

    #unit test
    reset_sequence_ok('emp_seq');

    dataset_ok(
        emp => [ename => "John", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp => [ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"]
    );

    .... 

    expected_dataset_ok(
        emp => [empno => 1, ename => "John", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp => [empno => 2, ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"]
    )

Sequence tests with PostgreSQL

    t/sql/create_schema.sql
    CREATE SEQUENCE emp_seq;
    CREATE TABLE emp(
    empno      INT4 DEFAULT nextval('emp_seq') NOT NULL,
    ename      VARCHAR(10),
    job        VARCHAR(20),
    mgr        NUMERIC(4),
    hiredate   DATE,
    sal        NUMERIC(7,2),
    comm       NUMERIC(7,2),
    deptno     NUMERIC(2),
    CONSTRAINT emp_pk PRIMARY KEY(empno),
    FOREIGN KEY (deptno) REFERENCES dept (deptno) 
   );

    #unit test
    reset_sequence_ok('emp_seq');
    ....

Auto generated field values tests with MySQL

    t/sql/create_schema.sql
    CREATE TABLE emp(
    empno     MEDIUMINT AUTO_INCREMENT, 
    ename      VARCHAR(10),
    job        VARCHAR(20),
    mgr        NUMERIC(4),
    hiredate   DATE,
    sal        NUMERIC(7,2),
    comm       NUMERIC(7,2),
    deptno     NUMERIC(2),
    CONSTRAINT emp_pk PRIMARY KEY(empno),
    FOREIGN KEY (deptno) REFERENCES dept (empno) 
   );

    #unit test
    reset_sequence_ok('emp');

    dataset_ok(
        emp => [ename => "John", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp => [ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"]
    );

    .... 

    expected_dataset_ok(
        emp => [empno => 1, ename => "John", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"],
        emp => [empno => 2, ename => "Scott", deptno => "10", job => "project manager"]
    )

Working with LOBs

For handling very large datasets, the DB vendors provide the LOB (large object) data types. You may use this features, and this module allows you test it.

LOBs tests with Oracle

Oracle BLOB data type that contains binary data with a maximum size of 4 gigabytes. It is advisable to store blob size in separate column to optimize fetch process.(doc_size)

    CREATE TABLE image(id NUMBER, name VARCHAR2(100), doc_size NUMBER, blob_content BLOB);

    dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => 1, ename => 'scott', deptno => 10],
        image  => [id => 1, name => 'Moon'
            blob_content => {file => 'data/chart1.jpg', size_column => 'doc_size'}
        ]
    );

    .....

    expected_dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => 1, ename => 'scott', deptno => 10],
        image  => [id => 1, name => 'Moon'
            blob_content => {file => 'data/chart2.jpg', size_column => 'doc_size'}
        ]
    );

LOBs tests with PostgreSQL

PostgreSQL has the large object facility, but in this case the tested table doesn't contain LOBs type instead it keeps reference to lob_id, created by lo_creat PostgreSQL functions. It requires storing blob size in separate column to be able to fetch blob.(doc_size)

    CREATE TABLE image(id NUMERIC, name VARCHAR(100), doc_size NUMERIC, blob_content oid)

    dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => 1, ename => 'scott', deptno => 10],
        image  => [id => 1, name => 'Moon'
            blob_content => {file => 'data/chart1.jpg', size_column => 'doc_size'}
        ]
    );

LOBs test with MySQL

In MySQL, binary LOBs are just table fields like any other types , so storing blob size is optional.

    CREATE TABLE lob_test(id NUMERIC, name VARCHAR(100), doc_size NUMERIC, blob_content LONGBLOB)

    dataset_ok(
        emp   => [empno => 1, ename => 'scott', deptno => 10],
        image  => [id => 1, name => 'Moon'
            blob_content => {file => 'data/chart1.jpg', size_column => 'doc_size'}
        ]
    );

Testing database stored procedures/functions

You may need to test execution of database stored procedures/functions. This module allows you test both normal and exception execution path.

    execute_ok($plsql, $expected_values);
    throws_ok($sql, $errcode, $errmsg, $description);

Testing database schema objects

It can be useful to validate existence or characteristic of any schema objects including tables, columns, indexes, constraints, etc .... No once do the staging, life environments have discrepancy starting with missing indexes, constraints, ending at difference in the table structures. This may lead too many problems including poor performance due to missing or wrong index type, execution errors caused by incorrect columns data type, logical errors by wrong or missing trigger/function.

It's felt that validation of schema objects significantly mitigate the risk of having out of sync state. The following method allows you tests schema objects:

Table validation

Allows you testing existence/non-existence of the particular table.

    has_table('table1');
    hasnt_table('table1');

Table's columns validation

Focuses on testing existence/non existence column, additionally you may test column definition.

    has_columns('table1', [
        'column1', 'column2', 'columnN'
    ]);

    has_column('table1', 'column1');
    hasnt_column('table1', 'column1');
    column_is_null('table1', 'column1');
    column_is_not_null('table1', 'columne2');
    column_type_is('table1', 'column1', 'varchar(20)');

Constraints validation

Gives you options to validate primary, foreign keys.

    has_pk('table1', 'id');
    has_fk('table2', 'tab1_id', 'table1');

Indexes validation.

Allows you testing existence of the index, you may also test index uniqueness, type.

    has_index('table1', 'tab1_idx1', 'column1');
    index_is_unique('table1', tab_idx1');
    index_is_primary('tabl1', 'tab_idx_pk');
    index_is_type('tabl1', 'tab_idx_pk', 'btree');

Functions/procedures validation

You may be interested in testing both existence of database functions/procedures with the specified interface.

    has_routine('approve_document', ['IN varchar', 'RETURN record']);

You may automatically create schema objects tests using Test::DBUnit::Generator module.

EXPORT

expected_data_set_ok dataset_ok expected_xml_dataset_ok xml_dataset_ok reset_schema_ok populate_schema_ok reset_sequence_ok execute_ok throws_ok has_table hasnt_table has_view hasnt_view has_column hasnt_column has_columns column_is_null column_is_not_null column_type_is has_sequence hasnt_sequence has_pk has_fk has_index index_is_unique index_is_primary index_is_type has_trigger trigger_is has_routine set_refresh_load_strategy set_insert_load_strategy add_test_connection set_test_connection test_connection test_dbh by default.

<connection_name>_(expected_data_set_ok | dataset_ok | expected_xml_dataset_ok | xml_dataset_ok | reset_schema_ok | populate_schema_ok | reset_sequence_ok | execute_ok | throws_ok | has_table | hasnt_table | has_view | hasnt_view | has_column | hasnt_column | has_columns | column_is_null | column_is_not_null column_type_is | has_pk | has_fk | has_index | index_is_unique | index_is_primary | index_is_type has_trigger | trigger_is | has_routine set_refresh_load_strategy | set_insert_load_strategy) by connection_name tags.

METHODS

connection_name
generate_connection_test_stubs

Generated test stubs on fly for passed in connection names.

reset_schema_ok

Tests database schema reset using sql file. Takes file name as parameter.

    use Test::More tests => $tests; 
    use Test::DBUnit dsn => $dsn, username => $username, password => $password;

    ...

    reset_schema_ok('t/sql/create_schema.sql');
populate_schema_ok

Tests database schema population using sql file. Takes file name as parameter.

    use Test::More tests => $tests; 
    use Test::DBUnit dsn => $dsn, username => $username, password => $password;

    ...

    populate_schema_ok('t/sql/populate_schema.sql');
reset_sequence_ok

Resets database sequence. Takes sequence name as parameter.

    use Test::More tests => $tests; 
    use Test::DBUnit dsn => $dsn, username => $username, password => $password;


    reset_sequnce('table_seq1');
xml_dataset_ok

Tests database schema population/sync to the content of the xml file. Takes test unit name, that is used to resolve xml file name. Xml file name that will be loaded is build as follow <test_file>.<unit_name>.xml for instance the following invocation xml_dataset_ok('test1') from t/sub_dir/001_test.t file will expect t/sub_dir/001_test.test1.xml file.

    <dataset load_strategy="INSERT_LOAD_STRATEGY" reset_sequences="emp_seq">
        <emp ename="scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
        <emp ename="john"  deptno="10" job="engineer" />
        <emp ename="mark"  deptno="10" job="sales assistant" />
        <bonus ename="scott" job="project manager" sal="20" />
    </dataset>
expected_xml_dataset_ok

Validates expected database loaded from xml file against database schema. Takes test unit name, that is used to resolve xml file name. Xml file name that will be loaded is build as follow <test_file>.<unit_name>.xml unless you pass full xml file name. for instance the following invocation xml_dataset_ok('test1') from t/sub_dir/001_test.t file will expect t/sub_dir/001_test.test1.xml file.

    <dataset load_strategy="INSERT_LOAD_STRATEGY" reset_sequences="emp_seq,dept_seq">
        <emp ename="Scott" deptno="10" job="project manager" />
        <emp ename="John"  deptno="10" job="engineer" />
        <emp ename="Mark"  deptno="10" job="sales assistant" />
        <bonus ename="Scott" job="project manager" sal="20" />
    </dataset>
dataset_ok

Tests database schema population/sync to the passed in dataset.

    dataset_ok(
        $table => $row1,
        $table => $row2,
        $description
    );

    dataset_ok(
        table1 => [], #this deletes all data from table1 (DELETE FROM table1)
        table2 => [], #this deletes all data from table2 (DELETE FROM table2)
        table1 => [col1 => 'va1', col2 => 'val2'], #this insert or update depend on strategy
        table1 => [col1 => 'xval1', col2 => 'xval2'],
    )
expected_dataset_ok

Validates database schema against passed in dataset.

    expected_dataset_ok(
        table1 => [col1 => 'va1', col2 => 'val2'], 
    )

    expected_dataset_ok(
        table1 => [col1 => 'va11', col2 => 'val2'],
        table1 => [col1 => 'va13', col2 => 'val4'],
        $desctiption
    );
execute_ok

Tests execution of the plsql code against expected values.

    execute_ok($plsql, $expected_resultset);
    execute_ok($plsql, $expected_resultset, $bind_variables_definition);
    execute_ok($plsql, $expected_resultset, $bind_variables_definition, $description);

    execute_ok("SELECT my_function(NOW()) INTO :var", {var => 360});
throws_ok

Tests database exceptions.

    throws_ok($sql, $errcode, $errmsg, $description);
    throws_ok($sql, $errcode, $errmsg);
    throws_ok($sql, $errmsg);
    throws_ok($sql, $errmsg, $description);
    throws_ok($sql, $errcode);

SCHEMA TESTS METHODS

This part focus on testing schema objects like table, column, index, triggers, function, procedures.(clear database test)

API of the following methods partly was inspired by PgTap http://pgtap.projects.postgresql.org/

has_table

Tests if the specified table exists.

    has_table($schema, $table, $description);
    has_table($table, $description);
    has_table($table);
hasnt_table

Tests if the specified table doesn't exist.

    hasnt_table($schema, $table, $description);
    hasnt_table($table, $description);
    hasnt_table($table);
has_view

Tests if the specified view exists.

    has_view($schema, $view, $description);
    has_view($view, $description);
    has_view($view);
hasnt_view

Tests if the specified view exists.

    hasnt_view($schema, $view, $description);
    hasnt_view($view, $description);
    hasnt_view($view);
has_column

Tests if the specified column exists in the given table.

    has_column($schema, $table, $column, $description);
    has_column($table, $column, $description);
    has_column($table, $column);
has_sequence

Tests if the specified table exists.

    has_sequence($schema, $sequence, $description);
    has_sequence($sequence, $description);
    has_sequence($sequence);
hasnt_sequence

Tests if the specified table doesn't exist.

    hasnt_sequence($schema, $sequence, $description);
    hasnt_sequence($sequence, $description);
    hasnt_sequence($sequence);
has_columns

Tests if all specified columns exist for given table.

    my $columms = ['id', 'name']
    
    has_columns($schema, $table, $columms);
    has_columns($schema, $table, $columms, $description);
    has_columns($table, $columms);
    has_columns($table, $columms, $description);
hasnt_column

Tests if the specified column doesn't exist in the given table.

    hasnt_column($schema, $table, $column, $description);
    hasnt_column($table, $column, $description);
    hasnt_column($table, $column);
column_is_null

Tests if the specified column is nullable

    column_is_null($schema, $table, $columm, $description);
    column_is_null($table, $columm, $description);
    column_is_null($table, $columm);
column_is_not_null

Tests if the specified column is not nullable

    column_is_not_null($schema, $table, $columm, $description);
    column_is_not_null($table, $columm, $description);
    column_is_not_null($table, $columm);
column_type_is

Tests if the specified column's type for given table matches underlying column type definition.

    column_type_is($schema, $table, $columm, $type);
    column_type_is($schema, $table, $columm, $type, $description);
    column_type_is($table, $columm, $type);
column_default_is

Tests the specified default value matches database column definition.

    column_default_is_ok($schema, $table, $columm, $default);
    column_default_is_ok($schema, $table, $columm, $default, $description);
    column_default_is_ok($table, $columm, $default);
column_is_unique
    column_is_unique($table, $column);
    column_is_unique($schema, $table, $column);
    column_is_unique($schema, $table, $column, $description);
has_pk

Tests existence of the primary key for given table with optionally specified columns that should be part of the primary key.

    has_pk($table);
    has_pk($schema, $table);
    has_pk($table, $column_or_columns);
    has_pk($schema, $table, $column_or_columns);


    has_pk($schema, $table, $description);
    has_pk($table, $column_or_columns, $description);
    has_pk($schema, $table, $column_or_columns, $description);
has_fk

Tests existence of the foreign key for given table and reference table with the specified columns.

    has_fk($schema, $table, $columns, $referenced_schema, $referenced_table);
    has_fk($table, $columns, $referenced_table);
    has_fk($schema, $table, $columns, $referenced_schema, $referenced_table, $description);
    has_fk($table, $columns, $referenced_table, $description);
has_index

Tests index existence for given table with the optionally specified columns.

    has_index($table, $index, $column_or_expressions);
    has_index($schema, $table, $index, $column_or_expressions);
    has_index($table, $index);
    has_index($schema, $table, $index);
    
    has_index($table, $index, $column_or_expressions, $desciption);
    has_index($schema, $table, $index, $column_or_expressions, $desciption);
    has_index($table, $index, $desciption);
    has_index($schema, $table, $index, $desciption);
index_is_unique
    index_is_unique($schema, $table, $index);
    index_is_unique($table, $index);
    index_is_unique($schema, $table, $index, $description);
    index_is_unique($table, $index, $description);
index_is_primary
    index_is_primary($schema, $table, $index);
    index_is_primary($table, $index);
    index_is_primary($schema, $table, $index, $description);
    index_is_primary$table, $index, $description);
index_is_type

Tests if the specified index's type matches defined index type

    index_is_type($schema, $table, $index, $type);
    index_is_type($table, $index, $type);
    index_is_type($schema, $table, $index, $type, $description);
    index_is_type($table, $index, $type, $description);

    type can be:
    - btree, bitmap, etc. - check you database vendor documentation.
has_trigger

Tests if the specified trigger exists for the given table.

    has_trigger($schema, $table, $trigger);
    has_trigger($table, $trigger);
    has_trigger($schema, $table, $trigger, $description);
    has_trigger($table, $trigger, $description);
trigger_is

Tests if the specified trigger body matches the trigger body (or function in case of postgresql)

    trigger_is($schema, $table, $trigger, $trigger_body);
    trigger_is($table, $trigger, $trigger_body);
    trigger_is($schema, $table, $trigger, $trigger_body, $description);
    trigger_is($table, $trigger, $trigger_body, $description);
has_routine

Tests if the specified routine exists in database and optionally has expected arguments type.

    my $args = ['type1', 'type2', 'return_type'];
    or
    my $args = ['IN type1', 'OUT type2', 'type3'];
    or
    my $args = ['name1 type1', 'name2 type2', 'return type3'];
    or
    my $args = ['IN name1 type1', 'INOUT name2 type2', 'return type3'];

    has_routine($schema, $function);
    has_routine($function);
    has_routine($schema, $function, $args);
    has_routine($function, $args);

    has_routine($schema, $function, $description);
    has_routine($schema, $function, $args, $description);
    has_routine($function, $args, $description);
    has_routine($function, $description);
_initialise_connection

Initializes default test connection

test_connection_context

Returns tested connection name,

test_connection

Returns test connection object.

add_test_connection

Adds tests connection

    use Test::DBUnit;

    # or

    use Test::DBUnit connection_names => ['my_connection_name', 'my_connection_name1'];

    my $connection = DBIx::Connection->new(...);
    add_test_connection($connection);

    #or

    add_test_connection('my_connection_name', dsn =>  $dsn, username => $username, password => 'password');

    #or

    add_test_connection('my_connection_name', dbh => $dbh);

Note: By default there is "test" connection name, so if you would like to use only DBI then add $dbh as 'test' connection

    add_test_connection('test', dbh => $dbh);
set_test_connection

Sets test connection that will be tested.

test_dbh

Returns test database handler.

set_insert_load_strategy

Sets insert as the load strategy

set_refresh_load_strategy

Sets refresh as the load strategy

_xml_test_file

Returns xml file prefix to test

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

The Test::DBUnit module is free software. You may distribute under the terms of either the GNU General Public License or the Artistic License, as specified in the Perl README file.

SEE ALSO ^

DBUnit Test::DBUnit::Generator DBIx::Connection

AUTHOR ^

Adrian Witas, adrian@webapp.strefa.pl

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