Andy Armstrong > File-Find-Parallel-0.52 > File::Find::Parallel

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NAME ^

File::Find::Parallel - Traverse a number of similar directories in parallel

VERSION ^

This document describes File::Find::Parallel version 0.52

SYNOPSIS ^

    use File::Find::Parallel;

    my $ffp = File::Find::Parallel->new( qw( /foo /bar ) );

    print "Union:\n";
    my $union = $ffp->any_iterator
    print "  $_\n" while $_ = $union->();

    print "Intersection:\n";
    my $inter = $ffp->all_iterator
    print "  $_\n" while $_ = $inter->();

DESCRIPTION ^

File::Find is the ideal tool for quickly scanning a single directory. But sometimes it's nice to be able to perform operations on multiple similar directories in parallel. Perhaps you need to compare the contents of two directories or convert files that are shared in more than one directory into hard links.

This module manufactures iterators that visit each file and directory in either the union or the intersection of a number of directories. Hmm. What does that mean?

Given two directory trees like this

    foo
    foo/a
    foo/b/c
    foo/d

    bar
    bar/a
    bar/b
    bar/e

you can choose to work with the intersection of the two directory structures:

    .
    ./a
    ./b

That is the subdirectories and files that the foo and bar share.

Alternately you can work with the union of the two directory structures:

    .
    ./a
    ./b
    ./b/c
    ./d
    ./e

Still not clear? Well, if you wanted to do a recursive diff on the two directories you'd iterate their union so you could report files that were present in foo but missing from bar and vice-versa.

If, on the other hand you wanted to scan the directories and find all the files that are common to all of them you'd iterate their intersection and receive only files and directories that were present in all the directories being scanned.

The any_iterator and all_iterator are built on a more general purpose method: want_iterator. If, for example, you want to make links between files that are found in more than one directory you might get your iterator like this:

    my $iter = $ffp->want_iterator( 2 );

The apparently magic '2' reflects the fact that if you're going to be making links you need at least two files. No matter how many directories you are iterating over in parallel you will only see files and directories that appear in at least two of those directories.

File::Find::Parallel can scan any number of directories at the same time. Here's an example (on Unix systems) that returns the list of all files and directories that are contained in all home directories.

    use File::Glob ':glob';
    use File::Find::Parallel;

    my $find = File::Find::Parallel->new( bsd_glob( '/home/*' ) );

    my @common = ( );
    my $iter = $find->all_iterator;
    while ( defined my $obj = $iter->() ) {
        push @common, $obj;
    }

    print "The following files are common to ",
          "all directories below /home :\n";

    print "    $_\n" for @common;

For a complete concrete example of its use see lncopies in the bin subdirectory of this distribution.

Iterators

The iterator returned by any_iterator, all_iterator or want_iterator is a code reference. Call it to get the next file or directory. When all files and directories have been returned the iterator will return undef.

Once created an iterator is independent of the File::Find::Parallel object that created it. If the object goes out of scope and is destroyed during the life of the iterator it will still function normally.

You may have many active iterators for a single File::Find::Parallel object at any time.

INTERFACE ^

new

Create a new File::Find::Parallel. You may optionally pass a list of directories to scan.

set_dirs( @dirs )

Set the list of directories to be scanned. Any number of directories may be scanned. If you are scanning just a single directory consider using File::Find instead.

get_dirs

Get the list of directories to be scanned.

    my @dirs_to_scan = $ffp->get_dirs;
add_dirs

Add to the list of directories to be scanned.

    $ffp->add_dirs( 'a' );
    $ffp->add_dirs( 'b', 'c' );
any_iterator

Get an iterator that will return the names of all the files and directories that are in the union of the directories to be scanned.

The returned iterator is a code reference that returns a new name each time it is called. It returns undef when all names have been returned.

The returned names are relative to the base directories. Given directories like this

    foo             bar
    foo/a           bar/a
    foo/b/c         bar/d/e

the iterator would return

    .
    a
    b
    d
    b/c
    d/e

That is it returns the list of names that would result if foo was copied over bar and then bar scanned. Note that the starting directory '.' is returned.

Directories are searched in breadth first order.

all_iterator

Get an iterator that will return the names of all the files and directories that are in the intersection of the directories to be scanned.

Given directories like this

    foo             bar
    foo/a           bar/a
    foo/b/c         bar/d/e

the iterator would return

    .
    a

That is it returns the names of those files and directories that can be found in both foo and bar.

want_iterator( $threshold )

Returns an iterator that returns all files and directories for which there are at least the specified number of instances across all directories being scanned. For example if you are scanning three directories and you need to perform some operation whenever a particular file is found in two or more of them:

    my $ffp = File::Find::Parallel->new( $dir1, $dir2, $dir3 );
    my $iter = $ffp->want_iterator( 2 );

    while ( my $obj = $iter->() ) {
        print "We have at least two copies of $obj\n";
    }

This is the primitive on which all_iterator and any_iterator are built.

DEPENDENCIES ^

The tests require File::Temp and optionally Test::Pod::Coverage and Test::Pod.

The lncopies script requires Getopt::Long and Pod::Usage.

BUGS AND LIMITATIONS ^

I haven't checked but it must be slower than File::Find. Use that instead if you only want to scan a single directory at a time.

Please report any bugs or feature requests to bug-file-find-parallel@rt.cpan.org, or through the web interface at http://rt.cpan.org.

AUTHOR ^

Andy Armstrong <andy@hexten.net>

LICENCE AND COPYRIGHT ^

Copyright (c) 2007-2008, Andy Armstrong <andy@hexten.net>. All rights reserved.

This module is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself. See perlartistic.

DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY ^

BECAUSE THIS SOFTWARE IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE SOFTWARE, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE SOFTWARE "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE SOFTWARE IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE SOFTWARE PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR, OR CORRECTION.

IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MAY MODIFY AND/OR REDISTRIBUTE THE SOFTWARE AS PERMITTED BY THE ABOVE LICENCE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE SOFTWARE (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE SOFTWARE TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER SOFTWARE), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

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