Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason > git-deploy-6.01 > design.pod

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Design Objectives ^

Use configuration not auto-detection

One problem with the ancestor of git-deploy was that in a misguided attempt to make things easier it attempted to do a lot of auto-detection. In hindsight this was almost definitely counter productive. It neither made it easier for the users, nor for the developers. git-deploy should avoid this mistake and use explicit configuration for everything it does .

Delegate and not implement

git-deploy is intended to manage the rollout process, not to actually be responsible for every action. An example would be the process of copying the tree to another host, which will always be the responsibility of a some other tool, although may/will be managed by git-deploy

The part of the job that git-deploy should implement is anything involving most aspects of managing git, interacting with the user, configuration, providing locks and logging, etc. Everything else should be delegated.

So for instance a check that the git tree does not contain unpushed commits is something that git-deploy should know how to do, but it should not directly know how to restart a webserver. It is ok if the git-deploy package provides ready made hooks that do things like this, which the user can then configure to be used, but they should never be part of the core behaviour of git-deploy itself.

Always design for the complex case

In general git-deploy is intended for managing rolling out many servers in a multi-step process that involves some level of user management. While it does provide tools for simpler scenarios, any feature it implements should generally "fit" into that general process.

Every rolled out commit should be reachable from the primary branch.

In general git-deploy is designed with the premise that we should always be able to "reach" a rolled out commit from git via git-log. It is possible that this is too restrictive and that it needs to be reconsidered, but it does make life easier as a dev.

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