Al Newkirk > Bubblegum-0.11 > Bubblegum::Object::String

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Module Version: 0.11   Source   Latest Release: Bubblegum-0.45

NAME ^

Bubblegum::Object::String - Common Methods for Operating on Strings

VERSION ^

version 0.11

SYNOPSIS ^

    use Bubblegum;

    my $greeting = 'hello world';
    say $greeting->titlecase->format('%s!!!'); # Hello World!!!

DESCRIPTION ^

String methods work on data that meets the criteria for being a string. A string holds and manipulates an arbitrary sequence of bytes, typically representing characters. Users of strings should be aware of the methods that modify the string itself as opposed to returning a new string. Unless stated, it may be safe to assume that the following methods copy, modify and return new strings based on their subjects. It is not necessary to use this module as it is loaded automatically by the Bubblegum class.

METHODS ^

eq

    my $string = 'User';
    $string->eq('user'); # 0; false
    $string->eq('User'); # 1; true

The eq method returns true if the argument matches the subject, otherwise returns false. Equality is case-sensative.

eqtv

    my $string = '123';
    $string->eqtv('123'); # 1; true
    $string->eqtv(123); # 0; false

The eqtv method returns true if the argument matches the subject's type and value, otherwise returns false. This function is akin to the strict-comparison operator in other languages.

format

    my $string = 'bobama';
    $string->format('/home/%s/etc'); # /home/bobama/etc

The format method returns a string formatted using the argument as a template and the subject as a variable using the same conventions as the 'sprintf' function.

gt

    my $string = 'abc';
    $string->gt('ABC'); # 1; true
    $string->gt('abc'); # 0; false

The gt method performs binary "greater than" and returns true if the subject is stringwise greater than the argument. Note, this operation expects the argument to be a string.

gte

    my $string = 'abc';
    $string->gte('abc'); # 1; true
    $string->gte('ABC'); # 1; true
    $string->gte('abcd'); # 0; false

The gte method performs binary "greater than or equal to" and returns true if the subject is stringwise greater than or equal to the argument. Note, this operation expects the argument to be a string.

lt

    my $string = 'ABC';
    $string->lt('abc'); # 1; true
    $string->lt('ABC'); # 0; false

The lt method performs binary "less than" and returns true if the subject is stringwise less than the argument. Note, this operation expects the argument to be a string.

lte

    my $string = 'ABC';
    $string->lte('abc'); # 1; true
    $string->lte('ABC'); # 1; true
    $string->lte('AB'); # 0; false

The lte method performs binary "less than or equal to" and returns true if the subject is stringwise less than or equal to the argument. Note, this operation expects the argument to be a string.

ne

    my $string = 'User';
    $string->ne('user'); # 1; true
    $string->ne('User'); # 0; false

The ne method returns true if the argument does not match the subject, otherwise returns false. Equality is case-sensative.

camelcase

    my $string = 'hello world';
    $string->camelcase; # HelloWorld

The camelcase method modifies the subject such that it will no longer have any non-alphanumeric characters and each word (group of alphanumeric characters separated by 1 or more non-alphanumeric characters) is capitalized. Note, this method modifies the subject.

chomp

    my $string = "name, age, dob, email\n";
    $string->chomp; # name, age, dob, email

The chomp method is a safer version of the chop method, it's used to remove the newline (or the current value of $/) from the end of the subject. Note, this method modifies and returns the subject.

chop

    my $string = "this is just a test.";
    $string->chop; # this is just a test

The chop method removes the last character of a string and returns the character chopped. It is much more efficient than "s/.$//s" because it neither scans nor copies the string. Note, this method modifies and returns the subject.

hex

    my $string = '0xaf';
    string->hex; # 175

The hex method returns the value resulting from interpreting the subject as a hex string.

index

    my $string = 'unexplainable';
    $string->index('explain'); # 2
    $string->index('explain', 0); # 2
    $string->index('explain', 1); # 2
    $string->index('explain', 2); # 2
    $string->index('explain', 3); # -1
    $string->index('explained'); # -1

The index method searches for the argument within the subject and returns the position of the first occurrence of the argument. This method optionally takes a second argument which would be the position within the subject to start searching from (also known as the base). By default, starts searching from the beginning of the string.

lc

    my $string = 'EXCITING';
    $string->lc; # exciting

The lc method returns a lowercased version of the subject.

lcfirst

    my $string = 'EXCITING';
    $string->lcfirst; # eXCITING

The lcfirst method returns a the subject with the first character lowercased.

length

    my $string = 'longggggg';
    $string->length; # 9

The length method returns the number of characters within the subject.

lines

    my $string = "who am i?\nwhere am i?\nhow did I get here";
    $string->lines; # ['who am i?','where am i?','how did i get here']

The lines method breaks the subject into pieces, split on 1 or more newline characters, and returns an array reference consisting of the pieces.

lowercase

    my $string = 'EXCITING';
    $string->lowercase; # exciting

The lowercase method is an alias to the lc method.

reverse

    my $string = 'dlrow ,olleH';
    $string->reverse; # Hello, world

The reverse method returns a string where the characters in the subject are in the opposite order.

rindex

    my $string = 'explain the unexplainable';
    $string->rindex('explain'); # 14
    $string->rindex('explain', 0); # 0
    $string->rindex('explain', 21); # 14
    $string->rindex('explain', 22); # 14
    $string->rindex('explain', 23); # 14
    $string->rindex('explain', 20); # 14
    $string->rindex('explain', 14); # 0
    $string->rindex('explain', 13); # 0
    $string->rindex('explain', 0); # 0
    $string->rindex('explained'); # -1

The rindex method searches for the argument within the subject and returns the position of the last occurrence of the argument. This method optionally takes a second argument which would be the position within the subject to start searching from (beginning at or before the position). By default, starts searching from the end of the string.

snakecase

    my $string = 'hello world';
    $string->snakecase; # helloWorld

The snakecase method modifies the subject such that it will no longer have any non-alphanumeric characters and each word (group of alphanumeric characters separated by 1 or more non-alphanumeric characters) is capitalized. The only difference between this method and the camelcase method is that this method ensures that the first character will always be lowercased. Note, this method modifies the subject.

split

    my $string = 'name, age, dob, email';
    $string->split(qr/\,\s*/); # ['name', 'age', 'dob', 'email']
    $string->split(qr/\,\s*/, 2); # ['name', 'age, dob, email']

The split method splits the subject into a list of strings, separating each chunk by the argument (regexp object), and returns that list as an array reference. This method optionally takes a second argument which would be the limit (number of matches to capture). Note, this operation expects the 1st argument to be a Regexp object.

strip

    my $string = 'one,  two,  three';
    $string->strip; # one, two, three

The strip method returns the subject replacing occurences of 2 or more whitespaces with a single whitespace. Note, this method modifies the subject.

titlecase

    my $string = 'mr. wellington III';
    $string->titlecase; # Mr. Wellington III

The titlecase method returns the subject capitalizing the first character of each word (group of alphanumeric characters separated by 1 or more whitespaces). Note, this method modifies the subject.

to_array

    my $string = 'uniform';
    $string->to_array; # ['uniform']

The to_array method is used for coercion and simply returns an array reference where the first element contains the subject.

to_code

    my $string = 'uniform';
    $string->to_code; # sub { 'uniform' }

The to_code method is used for coercion and simply returns a code reference which always returns the subject when called.

to_hash

    my $string = 'uniform';
    $string->to_hash; # { 'uniform' => 'uniform' }

The to_hash method is used for coercion and simply returns a hash reference with a single key and value, having the key and value both contain the subject.

to_integer

    my $string = 'uniform';
    $string->to_integer; # 0

    $string = '123';
    $string->to_integer; # 123

The to_integer method is used for coercion and simply returns the numeric version of the subject based on whether the subject "looks like a number", if not, returns 0.

to_string

    my $string = 'uniform';
    $string->to_string; # uniform

The to_string method is used for coercion and simply returns the subject.

trim

    my $string = ' system is   ready   ';
    $string->trim; # system is   ready

The trim method removes 1 or more consecutive leading and/or trailing spaces from the subject. Note, this method modifies the subject.

uc

    my $string = 'exciting';
    $string->uc; # EXCITING

The uc method returns an uppercased version of the subject.

ucfirst

    my $string = 'exciting';
    $string->ucfirst; # Exciting

The ucfirst method returns a the subject with the first character uppercased.

uppercase

    my $string = 'exciting';
    $string->uppercase; # EXCITING

The uppercase method is an alias to the uc method.

words

    my $string = "is this a bug we're experiencing";
    $string->words; # ["is","this","a","bug","we're","experiencing"]

The words method splits the subject into a list of strings, separating each group of characters by 1 or more consecutive spaces, and returns that list as an array reference.

AUTHOR ^

Al Newkirk <anewkirk@ana.io>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

This software is copyright (c) 2013 by Al Newkirk.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.

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