Andrew Yates > Data-Predicate-2.1.1 > Data::Predicate

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NAME ^

Data::Predicate

SYNOPSIS ^

  my $predicate = get_a_predicate(); #Say this returns true if an object is defined & a number
  $predicate->apply(1); #returns true
  $predicate->apply('a'); #returns false
  $predicate->apply(undef); #returns false
  
  my @data = (1, 'a', undef, 2, 3);
  $predicate->filter(\@data); #returns [1,2,3]
  $predicate->filter_transform(\@data, sub { $_*2 }); #returns [2,4,6]
  
  $predicate->all_true([1,2,3]); #Returns true
  $predicate->all_false([qw(a b c)]); #Returns true 

DESCRIPTION ^

This idea of predicates is taken from "/commons.apache.org/collections/'" in <a href='http:Apache Commons collections</a>> and "/code.google.com/p/google-collections/'" in <a href='http:google-collections</a>>.

Predicates are a way of composing logic so it eventually reports a true/false for a given value. The criteria for coming up with this reponse could be quite complex but always the answer has to be boolean. The predicates can also do filtering of an array reference of items and do transformations on those items when a predicate returns true.

Predicates also allow for more complex and/or statements to be built. For example:

  use Data::Predicate::Predicates qw(:all);
  my $or_predicate = p_or(map { p_string_equals($_) } qw(a b c d e f) );
  my $and_predicate = p_and( p_defined(), $or_predicate );
  
  my $truth = $and_predicate->apply('a');
  $truth = $and_predicate->apply('d');
  $truth = $and_predicate->apply('f');

This is functionally equivalent to:

  my ($v) = @_;
  if(defined $v && ( $v eq 'a' || $v eq 'b' || $v eq 'c' || $v eq 'd' || $v eq 'e' || $v eq 'f')) {
    
  }

This or code will also begin to shortcut operations in the same way the above if statement would have done.

However one word of warning is that you should not use predicates for matters where simple logic will suffice. Do not use it when doing simple if tests or simple list grepping. Predicates are not a Perlism and will make your code harder to read to the un-initiated.

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO USE ^

9 times out of 10 you want Data::Predicate::Predicates which provides a set of useful pre-built predicates. If this does not have a predicate to suit your mood then apply this role to a class of your own and start writing.

WHERE HAS MOUSE GONE? ^

I love Mouse and Moose but it was not a suitable choice for this project due to external users and the dependencies it introduces. It saddens me to remove it but in the long run I think it is the right decision.

METHODS ^

new()

Basic new method which does blessing of the current variable. Override & extend to bring your own slant to a predicate if required.

apply()

The core method; give it a reference and the apply method will return true or false depending on the predicate contents. Implemented to confess an error in this class.

filter()

  p_defined()->filter([undef,1,2]); #Will return [1,2]

More complex version of the apply which runs over a given array reference of items. The synopsis has a very good example of what it can do.

filter_transform()

  p_defined()->filter_transform([undef,1,2], sub { $_*2 }); #Will return [2,4]

An evolution of the filter code which when the predicate evaluates to true this code will then trigger a transformaiton process of the value and return a new list filled with these values.

all_true()

Returns true if all values in the given array reference were true. A quick way of deciding to accept a set of values without writing a loop.

all_false()

Returns false if all values in the given array reference were false. A quick way of deciding to reject a set of values without writing a loop.

AUTHOR ^

Andrew Yates

VERSION ^

2.0.0

LICENCE ^

Copyright (c) 2010 - 2010 European Molecular Biology Laboratory.

Author: Andrew Yates (ayatesattheebi - remove the relevant sections accordingly)

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

   1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright 
      notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
   2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright 
      notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the 
      documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
   3. Neither the name of the Genome Research Ltd nor the names of its 
      contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from 
      this software without specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

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