Tomas Doran > Catalyst-Plugin-Authorization-Roles-0.09 > Catalyst::Plugin::Authorization::Roles

Download:
Catalyst-Plugin-Authorization-Roles-0.09.tar.gz

Dependencies

Annotate this POD

CPAN RT

New  1
Open  0
View/Report Bugs
Module Version: 0.09   Source  

NAME ^

Catalyst::Plugin::Authorization::Roles - Role based authorization for Catalyst based on Catalyst::Plugin::Authentication

SYNOPSIS ^

    use Catalyst qw/
        Authentication
        Authorization::Roles
    /;

    sub delete : Local {
        my ( $self, $c ) = @_;

        $c->assert_user_roles( qw/admin/ ); # only admins can delete

        $c->model("Foo")->delete_it();
    }

DESCRIPTION ^

Role based access control is very simple: every user has a list of roles, which that user is allowed to assume, and every restricted part of the app makes an assertion about the necessary roles.

With assert_user_roles, if the user is a member in all of the required roles access is granted. Otherwise, access is denied. With assert_any_user_role it is enough that the user is a member in one role.

There are alternative approaches to do this on a per action basis, see Catalyst::ActionRole::ACL.

For example, if you have a CRUD application, for every mutating action you probably want to check that the user is allowed to edit. To do this, create an editor role, and add that role to every user who is allowed to edit.

    sub edit : Local {
        my ( $self, $c ) = @_;
        $c->assert_user_roles( qw/editor/ );
        $c->model("TheModel")->make_changes();
    }

When this plugin checks the roles of a user it will first see if the user supports the self check method.

When this is not supported the list of roles is extracted from the user using the roles method.

When this is supported, the check_roles method will be used to delegate the role check to the user class. Classes like the one provided with iCatalyst::Authentication::Store::DBIx::Class optimize the check this way.

METHODS ^

assert_user_roles [ $user ], @roles

Checks that the user (as supplied by the first argument, or, if omitted, $c->user) has the specified roles.

If for any reason ($c->user is not defined, the user is missing a role, etc) the check fails, an error is thrown.

You can either catch these errors with an eval, or clean them up in your end action.

check_user_roles [ $user ], @roles

Takes the same args as assert_user_roles, and performs the same check, but instead of throwing errors returns a boolean value.

assert_any_user_role [ $user ], @roles

Checks that the user (as supplied by the first argument, or, if omitted, $c->user) has at least one of the specified roles.

Other than that, works like assert_user_roles.

check_any_user_role [ $user ], @roles

Takes the same args as assert_any_user_role, and performs the same check, but instead of throwing errors returns a boolean value.

SEE ALSO ^

Catalyst::Plugin::Authentication
Catalyst::ActionRole::ACL
Catalyst::Manual::Tutorial::06_Authorization

AUTHOR ^

Yuval Kogman <nothingmuch@woobling.org>

COPYRIGHT & LICENSE ^

Copyright (c) 2005-2011 the Catalyst::Plugin::Authorization::Roles "AUTHOR" as listed above.

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

syntax highlighting: