David Cantrell > Class-Mockable-1.11 > Class::Mock::Method::InterfaceTester

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NAME ^

Class::Mock::Method::InterfaceTester

DESCRIPTION ^

A helper for Class::Mockable's method mocking

SYNOPSIS ^

In the class under test:

    # create a '_foo' wrapper around method 'foo'
    use Class::Mockable
        methods => { _foo => 'foo' };

And then in the tests:

    Some::Module->_set_foo(
        Class::Mock::Method::InterfaceTester->new([
            {
                input  => ...
                output => ...
            }
        ])
    );

METHODS ^

new

This is the constructor. It returns a blessed sub-ref. Class::Mockable's method mocking expects a sub-ref, so will Just Work (tm).

The sub-ref will behave similarly to the method calls defined in Class::Mock::Generic::InterfaceTester. That is, it will validate that the method is being called correctly and emit a test failure if it isn't, or if called correctly will return the specified value. If the method is ever called with the wrong parameters - including if defined method calls are made in the wrong order - then that's a test failure.

It is also a test failure to call the method fewer or more times than expected. Calling it fewer times than expected will be detected very late - when the subroutine goes away, so either at the end of the process or when it is redefined, eg with _reset_... (see Class::Mockable).

new() takes an arrayref of hashrefs as its argument. Those hashes must have keys 'input' and 'output' whose values define the ins and outs of each method call in turn. 'input' is always an arrayref which will get compared to all the method's arguments (excluding the first one, the object or class itself) but for validating very complex inputs you may specify a subroutine reference for the input, which will get executed with the actual input as its argument, and emit a failure if the call returns false.

If you want to check that the method is being invoked on the right object or class (if you are paranoid about inheritance, for example) then use the optional 'invocant_class' string to check that it's being called as a class method on the right class (not on a subclass, *the right class*), or invocant_object' string to check that it's being called on an object of the right class (again, not a subclass), or 'invocant_object' subref to check that it's being called on an object that, when passed to the sub-ref, returns true.

SEE ALSO ^

Class::Mockable

Class::Mock::Generic::InterfaceTester

AUTHOR ^

Copyright 2013 UK2 Ltd and David Cantrell <david@cantrell.org.uk>

This software is free-as-in-speech software, and may be used, distributed, and modified under the terms of either the GNU General Public Licence version 2 or the Artistic Licence. It's up to you which one you use. The full text of the licences can be found in the files GPL2.txt and ARTISTIC.txt, respectively.

SOURCE CODE REPOSITORY ^

<git://github.com/DrHyde/perl-modules-Class-Mockable.git>

BUGS/FEEDBACK ^

Please report bugs at Github <https://github.com/DrHyde/perl-modules-Class-Mockable/issues>

CONSPIRACY ^

This software is also free-as-in-mason.

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