Adriano Ferreira > Path-Classy-0.002_0 > Path::Classy

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Module Version: 0.002_0   Source  

NAME ^

Path::Classy - Augmented Path::Class (fancy stuff)

SYNOPSIS ^

    use Path::Classy qw( file );

    my $f = file( 'my/file' );

    my $size = $f->size(); # size in bytes
    my $h_size = $f->size({ format => 'h'}); # eg. '12K'

    my $mtime = $f->mtime; # secs since epoch
    my $mtime_days = $f->mtime({ as => 'days' }); # days since epoch
    my $mtime_dt = $f->mtime({ as => 'dt' }); # as a DateTime

    my $uri = $f->uri; # URI->new( 'file://...' );

DESCRIPTION ^

    This module is pretty much an experience by now.
    It is quite superfluous.

This module augments the API of Path::Class objects with a few more methods. The idea is: since you turned your paths into objects, why not take it as far as possible?

For example, after creating a Path::Class object:

    use Path::Class qw( file );

    my $f = file( 'foo.txt' );

there are some info you can get from the file attached to the current path:

    my $st = $f->stat;

But if you want to know if it exists already or its size (preferably in a nice format like '1G')? With Path::Class, you have to say

    print "exists already\n" if -e $f;
    printf "size: %s\n", -s $f;
                       # $f->stat->size works too

The filetest operators are quite nice and short. But if you want more consistency, you would expect methods to access this info:

    print "exists already\n" if $f->exists;
    printf "size: %s\n", $f->size;

Path::Classy provides some of these missing methods. It is far complete, as it is a very recent code. But it may occasionally be useful.

ATTENTION: Path::Classy does not export anything by default, while Path::Class exports 'file' and 'dir'.

METHODS ^

So far, only files were contemplated with extra methods. These are described below.

In the description below, $f is typically created with statements like

  use Path::Classy qw( file );
  $f = file( 'Path-Classy-0.001_0.tar.gz' );
size [ equiv: -s ]
  $size = $f->size(); 
  $size = $f->size(\%options);

Returns the file size. By the default, it returns the raw byte count. A 'format' option is accepted which support the following choices:

h

Returns the size in a human readable format (like '12K', '1G'). This is done by using Number::Bytes::Human.

''

Returns the raw byte size.

Equivalence to a filetest expression:

  $f->size      ~~     -s $f

Examples:

  # assume $f is a file with 24475 bytes
  $f->size() # 24475
  $f->size({ format => 'h' }) # '24K'
  $f->size({ format => '' }) # 24475
exists [ equiv: -e ]
  $yn = $f->exists;

Tells if the file exists or not.

Equivalence to a filetest expression:

  $f->exists    ~~     -e $f
mtime [ equiv: -M ]
  $mtime = $f->mtime;
  $mtime = $f->mtime(\%options);

Returns the modification time of the file. By default, it returns the number of seconds from epoch (as $f->stat->mtime does). It supports options 'from' and 'as'. The option 'from' specifies the time from a certain reference and the possible choices are:

'epoch'

The time is specified since the epoch. (The epoch was at 00:00 January 1, 1970 GMT.)

'start'

The time is specified since the start time of the script (as given by $^T).

The default is 'epoch'.

The option 'as' determines how the time is returned. The supported choices are:

'sec'

The time in seconds since the reference specified by 'from'.

'days'

The time in days since the reference specifed by 'from'.

'dt'

The time as a DateTime object. It should be independent of the reference given by 'from'.

The default is 'sec'.

With this method, the equivalence to a filetest expression is not that nice:

  $f->mtime({ from => 'start', as => 'days' })

is

  -( -M $f )

because -M $f is the script start time minus file modification time in days. In turn,

  $f->mtime()  ~~ $f->stat->mtime

Examples:

  $f->mtime(); # file mod time since epoch (in secs)
  $f->mtime({ as => 'days' }); # idem (in days)
  $f->mtime({ as => 'dt' }); # file mod time as a DateTime

  $f->mtime({ from => 'epoch', as => 'days' }); # same as $f->mtime

  $f->mtime({ from => 'start' }); # file mod time since script start time (in secs)
  $f->mtime({ from => 'start', as => 'days' }); # same as -( -M $f )
  $f->mtime({ from => 'start', as => 'dt' }); # as a DateTime

When using as => 'dt', it should not make any difference which reference time ('epoch' or 'start') is chosen (except for computation errors). Prefer from => 'epoch' (which can be omitted) because there are less computations involved.

atime [ equiv: -A ]
  $atime = $f->atime;
  $atime = $f->atime(\%options);

Returns the access time of the file. Everything that was said about mtime applies here. By default, it returns the number of seconds from epoch (as $f->stat->atime does). And it supports the options 'from' and 'as' with the same choices as 'mtime' does.

ctime [ equiv: -C ]
  $ctime = $f->ctime;
  $ctime = $f->ctime(\%options);

Returns the creation (or inode change) time of the file (for filesystems which support it). Everything that was said about mtime applies here. By default, it returns the number of seconds from epoch (as $f->stat->ctime does). And it supports the options 'from' and 'as' with the same choices as 'mtime' does.

uri
  $uri = $f->uri;

Returns a 'file://' URI pointing to the actual file.

BUGS ^

Please report bugs via CPAN RT http://rt.cpan.org/NoAuth/Bugs.html?Dist=Path-Classy or mailto://bugs-Path-Classy@rt.cpan.org.

SEE ALSO ^

  Path::Class
  File::Spec

AUTHORS ^

Adriano R. Ferreira, <ferreira@cpan.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

Copyright (C) 2008 by Adriano R. Ferreira

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

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