Ingy döt Net > lexicals-0.21 > lexicals

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Module Version: 0.21   Source  

SYNOPSIS ^

    use Template::Toolkit::Simple;
    use lexicals;

    sub mail {
        my $self = shift;
        my $name = 'Mr. ' . $self->get_name;
        my $address = $self->fetch_address($name);
        my $stamp = Postage::Stamp->new(0.44);
        my $envelope = tt->render('envelope', lexicals);
    }

DESCRIPTION ^

Python has a builtin function called `locals()` that returns the lexically scoped variables in a name/value mapping. This is a very useful idiom. Instead of needing to create a hash like this:

    my $hash = {
        foo => $foo,
        bar => $bar,
    };

Just say:

    my $hash = lexicals;

Assuming you have a $foo and $bar defined, you get the same thing.

The `lexicals` module exports a function called `lexicals`. This function returns the lexicals as a hash reference (in scalar or list context).

ARRAYS AND HASHES ^

The above examples deal with lexical scalars. You can also get back lexical arrays and hashes. Note: since there is no sigil to tell scalars from arrays from hashes, you can't get back a scalar and an array or hash of the same name. In this case, SCALAR beats HASH beats ARRAY. Why? Because I said so! (Actually I just used the sort order of the sigils).

    sub foo {
        my %h = ( O => 'HAI' );
        my @a = [ qw( foo bar baz ) ];
        my $s = 42;
        my %x = ( O => 'HAI' );
        my @x = [ qw( foo bar baz ) ];
        my $x = 42;
        print Dump lexicals;
    }

would yield:

    ---
    a:
    - foo
    - bar
    - baz
    h:
      O: HAI
    s: 42
    x: 42

NOTE ^

The lexicals function only reports the lexical variables variables that were defined before where it gets called.

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