John Napiorkowski > DBIx-Class-Migration-RunScript-Trait-AuthenPassphrase-0.001 > DBIx::Class::Migration::RunScript::Trait::AuthenPassphrase

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NAME ^

DBIx::Class::Migration::RunScript::Trait::AuthenPassphrase - encode values

SYNOPSIS ^

    use DBIx::Class::Migration::RunScript;

    builder {
      'AuthenPassphrase',
      sub {
        my $self = shift;
        my $password = 'plaintext';
        my $encoded = $self->authen_passphrase(\%args, $password)
        $self->resultset('User')->create({name=>"Mr Echo",password=>$encoded});
      };
    };

DESCRIPTION ^

This trait is only useful if you are using DBIx::Class::Migration. We've supplied this as an external CPAN module since Authen::Passphrase has a dependency weight we didn't want to impose on core DBIx::Class::Migration.

Sometimes when you are adding data to your schema, you need to encode the value for security purposes. For example, if you are adding rows to a User table you could be including a password . Best security practice requires that you don't store passwords in plain text. Typically you will either encrypt the password (allows you to retrieve it if required, but vulnerable to theft) or use some sort of hashing algorithm (you can check but never retrieve the password, probably best option under current practices).

Typically when using DBIx::Class you will use a component such as one of the following: DBIx::Class::PassphraseColumn, DBIx::Class::DigestColumns or DBIx::Class::EncodedColumn to assist in doing this correctly. Support for this approach is baked into many authentication systems for popular web frameworks, such as Catalyst::Authentication::Store::DBIx::Class.

This makes the process of doing the right thing for the security of your user's passwords easy. However when using DBIx::Class::Migration and perl run scripts, this introduces an issue, since the $schema that is passed to the run script is reverse engineered from the current deployed database and will not contain any of your custom added components. Thus if you try to insert passwords with a run script they will appear in plain text in the database.

In order to help with this problem, this trait can be applied to your run script builder and will expose an Authen::Password object. This will be compatible with DBIx::Class::PassphraseColumn which is the system I favor for hashing user passwords. So if for example you have a result class MyApp::Schema::User defined like:

    __PACKAGE__->load_components(qw(PassphraseColumn));

    __PACKAGE__->add_columns(
        id => {
            data_type         => 'integer',
            is_auto_increment => 1,
        },
        passphrase => {
            data_type        => 'text',
            passphrase       => 'rfc2307',
            passphrase_class => 'SaltedDigest',
            passphrase_args  => {
                algorithm   => 'SHA-1',
                salt_random => 20,
            },
            passphrase_check_method => 'check_passphrase',
        },
    );

__PACKAGE__->set_primary_key('id');

(Example copied from DBIx::Class::PassphraseColumnDBIx::Class::PassphraseColumn>)

You can supply correctly hashed passwords using the following:

    builder {
      'AuthenPassphrase',
      sub {
        my $self = shift;
        my $password = 'plaintext';
        my $args => {
           passphrase       => 'rfc2307',
            passphrase_class => 'SaltedDigest',
            passphrase_args  => {
                algorithm   => 'SHA-1',
                salt_random => 20,
            },

        };

        my $encoded = $self->authen_passphrase($args, $password);
        $self->resultset('User')->create({passphrase=>$encoded});
      };
    };

We have matched the arguments to how DBIx::Class::PassphraseColumn works so that it is easier for you to synchronize the configuration between both systems.

If you wish to use this trait with the migrate helper (which applies some useful traits by default), you should do the following:

    use DBIx::Class::Migration::RunScript;
    use DBIx::Class::Migration::RunScript::Trait::AuthenPassphrase;

    migrate {
      my $runscript = shift;
      ## $runscript->can('authen_passphrase') now.
    }

Although this is not as ideal a solution as finding a way to make sure the generated migration schema matches your custom schema, it does allow you to get this working as expected.

methods ^

This class defines the follow methods.

authen_passphrase

Requires a HashRef and a Scalar argument.

Returns an Authen::Passphrase encoded string, based on the provided \%args and $string to encode. See "SYNOPSIS" and "DESCRIPTION" for more.

SEE ALSO ^

DBIx::Class::Migration, DBIx::Class::Migration::RunScript, Authen::Passphrase.

AUTHOR ^

John Napiorkowski email:jjnapiork@cpan.org

COPYRIGHT & LICENSE ^

Copyright 2012, John Napiorkowski email:jjnapiork@cpan.org

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

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