Jason Morriss > PIX-Walker-1.10 > PIX::Walker

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NAME ^

PIX::Walker - Process Cisco PIX configs and 'walk' access-lists

SYNOPSIS ^

PIX::Walker is an object that allows you to process PIX (and ASA) firewall configs and 'walk' an access-list for matches. PIX OS versions 6 and 7 are supported. Note, ACL's that use the 'interface' keyword will not match properly since there is no way for the Walker to match an IP to an interface, at least not yet.

'Loose' ACL matching performed. This means that you can specify as little as a single IP to match what line(s) that IP would match in the ACL on the firewall. Or you can provide every detail including source/dest IPs, ports, and protocol to match a specific line of an ACL. Loose matching allows you to see potential lines in a large ruleset that a single source or destination IP might match.

More than just the first line match can be returned. If your search criteria can technically match multiple lines they will all be returned. This is useful for seeing extra matches in your ACL that might also match and can help you optimize your ACL.

EXAMPLE ^

  use PIX::Walker;

  my $config = "... firewall config buffer or filename ...";
  my $fw = new PIX::Walker($config);
  my $acl = $fw->acl("outside_access") || die("ACL does not exist");

  my $matched = 0;
  # search each line of the ACL for possible matches
  foreach my $line ($acl->lines) {
    if ($line->match(
        source => "10.0.1.100", 
        dest => "192.168.1.3", 
        dport => "80",          # dest port
        proto => "tcp")) {
      if (!$matched++) {
        print "Matched ACL " . $acl->name .
          " (" . $acl->elements . " ACE)\n";
      }
      print $line->print, "\n";
    }
  }

METHODS ^

new($config, [$not_a_file])

Returns a new PIX::Walker object using the $config string passed in. The configuration is processed and broken out into various objects automatically.

The $config string is either a full string buffer containing the configuration of a firewall or is used as a filename to read the configuration from, using various filename formats (tried with and without any extension on the filename)

        * {$config}
        * {$config}.conf

If $not_a_file is true then the $config string is never checked against the file system.

acl($name)

Returns an PIX::Accesslist object for the ACL named by $name.

acls()

Returns an array of access-list strings for each access-list found in the firewall configuration. Returns undef if there is no matching ACL. Use walker->acl('acl_name') to retrieve the actual PIX::Accesslist object.

add_acl($name, [\@conf])

Add's an access-list object to the PIX::Walker object. $conf is an arrayref of the configuration lines that make up the access-list and can be empty.

add_obj($name, $type, [\@conf])

Add's an object-group object to the PIX::Walker object. $conf is an arrayref of the configuration lines that make up the object-group and can be empty.

alias($alias)

Returns the IP of the alias given in $alias. If no alias is found than the string is returned unchanged.

findip($ip, [$trace])

Matches the IP to an existing network-group. Does not validate it within any ACL. If a single group is matched a scalar is returned with the name, otherwise an array reference is returned containing all matches.

* $ip is an IP address to look for.

* $trace is an optional reference to a trace buffer.

If an IP is found in a nested group the trace will allow you to find out where it was nested. See tracedump() for more information.

findport($port, [$trace])

Matches the PORT to an existing service-group. Does not validate it within any ACL. If a single group is matched a scalar is returned with the name, otherwise an array reference is returned containing all matches.

* $port is the PORT to look for.

* $trace is an optional reference to a trace buffer.

If a PORT is found in a nested group the trace will allow you to find out where it was nested. See tracedump() for more information.

obj($name)

Returns an PIX::Object object for the object-group that matches the $name given.

objs([$type])

Returns an array of object-group strings for each object-group found in the firewall configuration. If $type is specified only groups matching that type are returned.

Returns undef if there are no object-groups. Use walker->obj('obj_name') to retreive the actual PIX::Object object.

portnum($port)

Returns the port NUMBER of the port name given. This function will DIE() if the port name is not known. This is harsh because the routines that use this function will not work if a single port lookup fails (not being able to lookup a port number can cause some of your acl searching to fail). This function is meant to be used internally only.

tracedump($trace)

Prints out the trace dump given. This will allow you to see where IP's and PORT's are being matched within their object-groups even if they are nested.

        $matched = $fw->findip($ip, $trace);
        $fw->tracedump($trace);

AUTHOR ^

Jason Morriss <lifo 101 at - gmail dot com>

BUGS ^

Please report any bugs or feature requests to bug-pix-walker at rt.cpan.org, or through the web interface at http://rt.cpan.org/NoAuth/ReportBug.html?Queue=PIX-Walker. I will be notified, and then you'll automatically be notified of progress on your bug as I make changes.

SUPPORT ^

    perldoc PIX::Walker

    perldoc PIX::Accesslist
    perldoc PIX::Accesslist::Line

    perldoc PIX::Object
    perldoc PIX::Object::network
    perldoc PIX::Object::service
    perldoc PIX::Object::protocol
    perldoc PIX::Object::icmp_type

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ^

Peter Vargo - For pushing me to make this module and for supplying me with endless ideas.

COPYRIGHT & LICENSE ^

Copyright 2006-2008 Jason Morriss, all rights reserved.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

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