Marcel Grünauer > Test-Compile-0.13 > Test::Compile

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Module Version: 0.13   Source   Latest Release: Test-Compile-v1.0.1

NAME ^

Test::Compile - Check whether Perl module files compile correctly

SYNOPSIS ^

    #!perl -w
    use strict;
    use warnings;
    use Test::Compile;
    all_pm_files_ok();

DESCRIPTION ^

Test::Compile lets you check the validity of a Perl module file or Perl script file, and report its results in standard Test::Simple fashion.

    BEGIN {
        use Test::Compile tests => $num_tests;
        pm_file_ok($file, "Valid Perl module file");
    }

It's probably a good idea to run this in a BEGIN block. The examples below omit it for clarity.

Module authors can include the following in a t/00_compile.t file and have Test::Compile automatically find and check all Perl module files in a module distribution:

    use Test::More;
    eval "use Test::Compile 0.09";
    Test::More->builder->BAIL_OUT(
        "Test::Compile 0.09 required for testing compilation") if $@;
    all_pm_files_ok();

You can also specify a list of files to check, using the all_pm_files() function supplied:

    use strict;
    use Test::More;
    eval "use Test::Compile 0.09";
    Test::More->builder->BAIL_OUT(
        "Test::Compile 0.09 required for testing compilation") if $@;
    my @pmdirs = qw(blib script);
    all_pm_files_ok(all_pm_files(@pmdirs));

Or even (if you're running under Apache::Test):

    use strict;
    use Test::More;
    eval "use Test::Compile 0.09";
    Test::More->builder->BAIL_OUT(
        "Test::Compile 0.09 required for testing compilation") if $@;

    my @pmdirs = qw(blib script);
    use File::Spec::Functions qw(catdir updir);
    all_pm_files_ok(
        all_pm_files(map { catdir updir, $_ } @pmdirs)
    );

Why do the examples use BAIL_OUT() instead of skip_all()? Because testing whether a module compiles is important. skip_all() is ok to use with Test::Pod, because if the pod is malformed the program is still going to run. But checking whether a module even compiles is something else. Test::Compile should be mandatory, not optional.

FUNCTIONS ^

pm_file_ok(FILENAME[, TESTNAME ])

pm_file_ok() will okay the test if the Perl module compiles correctly.

When it fails, pm_file_ok() will show any compilation errors as diagnostics.

The optional second argument TESTNAME is the name of the test. If it is omitted, pm_file_ok() chooses a default test name Compile test for FILENAME.

pl_file_ok(FILENAME[, TESTNAME ])

pl_file_ok() will okay the test if the Perl script compiles correctly. You need to give the path to the script relative to this distribution's base directory. So if you put your scripts in a 'top-level' directory called script the argument would be script/filename.

When it fails, pl_file_ok() will show any compilation errors as diagnostics.

The optional second argument TESTNAME is the name of the test. If it is omitted, pl_file_ok() chooses a default test name Compile test for FILENAME.

all_pm_files_ok([@files/@directories])

Checks all the files in @files for compilation. It runs all_pm_files() on each file/directory, and calls the plan() function for you (one test for each function), so you can't have already called plan.

If @files is empty or not passed, the function finds all Perl module files in the blib directory if it exists, or the lib directory if not. A Perl module file is one that ends with .pm.

If you're testing a module, just make a t/00_compile.t:

    use Test::More;
    eval "use Test::Compile 0.09";
    plan skip_all => "Test::Compile 0.09 required for testing compilation"
      if $@;
    all_pm_files_ok();

Returns true if all Perl module files are ok, or false if any fail.

Or you could just let Module::Install::StandardTests do all the work for you.

all_pl_files_ok([@files])

Checks all the files in @files for compilation. It runs pl_file_ok() on each file, and calls the plan() function for you (one test for each file), so you can't have already called plan.

If @files is empty or not passed, the function uses all_pl_files() to find scripts to test

If you're testing a module, just make a t/00_compile_scripts.t:

    use Test::More;
    eval "use Test::Compile 0.09";
    plan skip_all => "Test::Compile 0.09 required for testing compilation"
      if $@;
    all_pl_files_ok();

Returns true if all Perl module files are ok, or false if any fail.

all_pm_files([@dirs])

Returns a list of all the perl module files - that is, files ending in .pm - in $dir and in directories below. If no directories are passed, it defaults to blib if blib exists, or else lib if not. Skips any files in CVS or .svn directories.

The order of the files returned is machine-dependent. If you want them sorted, you'll have to sort them yourself.

all_pl_files([@files/@dirs])

Returns a list of all the perl script files - that is, files ending in .pl or with no extension. Directory arguments are searched recursively . If arguments are passed, it defaults to script if script exists, or else bin if bin exists. Skips any files in CVS or .svn directories.

The order of the files returned is machine-dependent. If you want them sorted, you'll have to sort them yourself.

BUGS AND LIMITATIONS ^

No bugs have been reported.

Please report any bugs or feature requests through the web interface at http://rt.cpan.org.

INSTALLATION ^

See perlmodinstall for information and options on installing Perl modules.

AVAILABILITY ^

The latest version of this module is available from the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN). Visit <http://www.perl.com/CPAN/> to find a CPAN site near you. Or see http://search.cpan.org/dist/Test-Compile/.

AUTHORS ^

Sagar R. Shah <srshah@cpan.org>

Marcel Grünauer, <marcel@cpan.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

Copyright 2007-2009 by the authors.

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

SEE ALSO ^

Test::LoadAllModules just handles modules, not script files, but has more fine-grained control.

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