Maroš Kollár > MooseX-App-1.14 > MooseX::App::Tutorial

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NAME ^

MooseX::App::Tutorial - getting started with MooseX::App

GETTING STARTED ^

To create a simple command-line application with MooseX::App you need

BASE CLASS ^

The simplest possible base class just contains a single use statement which loads all roles and metaclasses you need to get started as well as Moose.

  package MyApp;
  use MooseX::App;
  1;

The base class can be customized by

  package MyApp;
  use MooseX::App qw(Config); # Loads the Config plugin
  
  # This attribute will be available at the command-line
  option 'some_global_option' => (
      is                => 'rw',
      isa               => 'Str',
      documentation     => q[Some important global option],
  );
  
  # This attribute  will not be exposed
  has 'private_option' => (
      is              => 'rw',
      isa             => 'Str',
  ); 
  
  1;

When adding attributes make sure to include a documentation and possibly a type constraint. MooseX-App will use this information to build a user documentation for each attribute and command.

COMMAND CLASSES ^

After you have created a base class it is time to create one class for each command you want to provide (unless you are using MooseX::App::Simple). The command classes must reside in the namespace of the base class (eg. 'MyApp::SomeCommand'). The namespace for the command classes however can be changed via the 'app_namespace' function in the base class.

All command classes must load MooseX::App::Command.

  package MyApp::SomeCommand;
  use MooseX::App::Command;

If you want to use global options defined in the base class you can optionally extend the base class with your command class.

  package MyApp::SomeCommand;
  use MooseX::App::Command;
  extends qw(MyApp);

To provide a description for each command you need to add command_short_description and command_long_description information. The command descriptions may contain linebreaks.

 command_short_description q[This command is awesome];
 command_long_description q[This command is awesome, yadda yadda yadda];

If not provided, MooseX-App will try to parse the command description from the POD. The NAME section will become the short description and the DESCRIPTION or OVERVIEW section the long description. If your class has no POD, MooseX-App will look for the DistZilla abstract tag.

The usage header can either be set by adding command_usage

 command_usage q[script some_command --some_option NUMBER];

or by adding a SYNOPSIS or USAGE section to the module' POD. If neither command_usage nor SYNOPSIS/USAGE are set, then the usage header will be autogenerated.

Attributes can be documented using the Moose built-in documentation option as well as cmd_tags which is defined by MooseX-App. Additionally the cmd_flag and cmd_aliases attributes defined in MooseX::Getopt::Meta::Attribute::Trait are also honoured.

  option 'some_option' => (
      is                => 'rw',
      isa               => 'Integer',
      required          => 1,
      documentation     => q[Some important option],
      cmd_tags          => [qw(Important!)],
      cmd_aliases       => [qw(so)], # From MooseX::Getopt
  );

The help for this command would look something like this (with autogenerated usage header):

  usage:
    my_app some_command [long options...]
    my_app help
    my_app some_command --help
  
  description:
    This command is awesome, yadda yadda yadda
  
  options:
    --config           Path to command config file
    --some_option --so Some important option [Required; Integer; Important!]
    --help --usage -?  Prints this usage information. [Flag]

In case you want to include an attribute not defined with the 'option' keyword you can use the 'AppOption' trait (MooseX::App::Meta::Attribute::Option).

  has 'myoption' => (
      is                => 'rw',
      traits            => ['AppOption'],
  );

Finally your command classes will need a method which should be called if the command is invoked by the user.

 sub run {
    my ($self) = @_;
    # do something
 }

If you need to implement only a single command you should use MooseX::App::Simple instead of MooseX::App, and omit command classes. In this case of course you have to declare all options and implement the application logic in the base class:

  package MyApp;
  use MooseX::App::Simple qw(Config); # Loads the Config plugin
  
  option 'some_global_option' => (
      is                => 'rw',
      isa               => 'Str',
      documentation     => q[Some important global option],
  );
  
  sub run {
     my ($self) = @_;
     # do something
  }
  
  1;

INVOCATION SCRIPT ^

Once you have the base and command classes ready, you need to write a small invocation script:

 #!/usr/bin/env perl
 use MyApp;
 MyApp->new_with_command->run();

MyApp->new_with_command will try to instantiate a command class. If it fails it will return a MooseX::App::Message::Envelope object possibly containing an error message and a user help message. Since MooseX::App::Message::Envelope follows the null object pattern you can call any method on it without checking the object type.

If using MooseX::App::Simple your invocation script needs some modification.

 #!/usr/bin/env perl
 use MyApp;
 MyApp->new_with_options->run();
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