Stefan G. > Kelp-0.455 > Kelp::Test

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Source   Latest Release: Kelp-0.9012

NAME ^

Kelp::Test - Automated tests for a Kelp web app

SYNOPSIS ^

    use MyApp;
    use Kelp::Test;
    use HTTP::Request::Common;

    my $app = MyApp->new;
    my $t = Kelp::Test->new( app => $app );

    $t->request( GET '/path' )
      ->code_is(200)
      ->content_is("It works");

    $t->request( POST '/api' )
      ->json_cmp({auth => 1});

DESCRIPTION ^

This module provides basic tools for testing a Kelp based web application. It is object oriented, and all methods return $self, so they can be chained together. Testing is done by sending HTTP requests to an already built application and analyzing the response. Therefore, each test usually begins with the "request" method, which takes a single HTTP::Request parameter. It sends the request to the web app and saves the response as an HTTP::Response object.

ENV VARIABLES ^

KELP_TESTING

This module sets the KELP_TESTING envinronmental variable to a true value.

ATTRIBUTES ^

app

The Kelp::Test object is instantiated with single attribute called app. It is a reference to a Kelp based web app.

    my $myapp = MyApp->new;
    my $t = Kelp::Test->new( app => $myapp );

From this point on, all requests run with $t->request will be sent to $app.

res

Each time $t-request> is used to send a request, an HTTP::Response object is returned and saved in the res attribute. You can use it to run tests, although as you will see, this module provides methods which make this a lot easier. It is recommended that you use the convenience methods rather than using res.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )
    is $t->res->code, 200, "It's a success";

METHODS ^

request

request( $http_request )

Takes an HTTP::Request object and sends it to the application. When the HTTP::Response object is returned, it is initialized in the "res" attribute. It is very convenient to use HTTP::Request::Common in your test modules, so you can take advantage of the simplified syntax for creating an HTTP request.

    $t->request( POST '/api', [ user => 'jane' ] );

This method returns $self, so other methods can be chained after it.

code_is, code_isnt

code_is( $code, $test_name ), code_isnt( $code, $test_name )

Tests if the last response returned a status code equal or not equal to $code. An optional name of the test can be added as a second parameter.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )->code_is(200);
    $t->request( GET '/path' )->code_isnt(500);

content_is, content_isnt

content_is( $value, $test_name ), content_isnt( $value, $test_name )

Tests if the last response returned content equal or not equal to $value. An optional name of the test can be added as a second parameter.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )->content_is("Ok.");
    $t->request( GET '/path' )->content_isnt("Fail.");

content_like, content_unlike

content_like( $regexp, $test_name ), content_unlike( $regexp, $test_name )

Tests if the last response returned content that matches or doesn't match $regexp. An optional name of the test can be added as a second parameter.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )->content_like(qr{Amsterdam});
    $t->request( GET '/path' )->content_unlike(qr{Rotterdam});

content_type_is, content_type_isnt

content_type_is( $value, $test_name ), content_type_isnt( $value, $test_name )

Tests if the last response's content-type header is equal or not equal to $value. An optional name of the test can be added as a second parameter.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )->content_type_is("text/plain");
    $t->request( GET '/path' )->content_type_isnt("text/html");

header_is, header_isnt

header_is( $header, $value, $test_name ), header_isnt( $header, $value, $test_name )

Tests if the last response returned a header $header that is equal or not equal to $value. An optional name of the test can be added as a second parameter.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )->header_is( "Pragma", "no-cache" );
    $t->request( GET '/path' )->header_isnt( "X-Check", "yes" );

header_like, header_unlike

header_like( $header, $regexp, $test_name ), header_unlike( $header, $regexp, $test_name )

Tests if the last response returned a header $header that matches or doesn't match $regexp. An optional name of the test can be added as a second parameter.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )->header_like( "Content-Type", qr/json/ );
    $t->request( GET '/path' )->header_unlike( "Content-Type", qr/image/ );

json_cmp

json_cmp( $expected, $test_name )

This tests for two things: If the returned content-type is application-json, and if the returned JSON structure matches the structure specified in $expected. To compare the two structures this method uses cmp_deeply from Test::Deep, so you can use all the goodies from the SPECIAL-COMPARISONS-PROVIDED section of the Test::Deep module.

    $t->request( GET '/api' )->json_cmp(
        {
            auth      => 1,
            timestamp => ignore(),
            info      => subhashof( { name => 'Rick James' } )
        }
    );

An optional name of the test can be added as a second parameter.

note

note( $note )

Print a note, using the Test::More note function.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )
      ->note("Checking headers now")
      ->header_is( "Content-Type", qr/json/ );

diag_headers

Prints all headers for debugging purposes.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )
      ->header_is( "Content-Type", qr/json/ )
      ->diag_headers();

diag_content

Prints the entire content for debugging purposes.

    $t->request( GET '/path' )
      ->content_is("Well")
      ->diag_content();
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