Simon Cozens > Image-Seek-0.01 > Image::Seek

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Module Version: 0.01   Source   Latest Release: Image-Seek-0.02

NAME ^

Image::Seek - A port of ImgSeek to Perl

DESCRIPTION ^

    use Image::Seek qw(loaddb add_image query_id savedb);

    loaddb("haar.db");

    # EITHER
    my $img = Imager->new();
    $img->open(file => "photo-216.jpg");
    # OR
    my $img = Image::Imlib2->load("photo-216.jpg");

    # Then...
    add_image($img, 216);
savedb("haar.db");

    my @results = query_id(216); # What looks like this photo?

DESCRIPTION ^

ImgSeek (http://www.imgseek.net/) is an implementation of Haar wavelet decomposition techniques to find similar pictures in a library. This module is port of the ImgSeek library to Perl's XS. It can deal with image objects produced by the Imager and Image::Imlib2 libraries.

EXPORT ^

None by default, but the following functions are available:

savedb($file)

Dumps the state of the norms and image buckets to the file $file.

loaddb($file)

Loads a database of image norms produced by savedb

cleardb

Clears the internal database. Note that loaddb will load into memory a bunch of data that you may already have - it will duplicate rather than replace this data, so results will be skewed if you load a database multiple times without clearing it in between.

add_image($image, $id)

Adds the image object to the database, keyed against the numeric id $id. This will compute the Haar transformation for a 128x128 thumbnail of the image, and then store its norms into a database in memory.

query_id($id[, $results))

This queries the internal database for pictures which are "like" number $id. It returns a list of $results results (by default, 10); a result is an array reference. The first element is the ID of a picture, the second is a score. So for example:

    query_id(2481, 5)

returns, in a shoot I have, the following:

          [ 2481, -38.3800003528595 ],
          [ 2480, -37.5519620793145 ],
          [ 2478, -37.39896965962   ],
          [ 2479, -37.2777427507208 ],
          [ 2584, -10.0803730081134 ],
          [ 2795, -7.89326129961427 ]

Notice that the scores go the opposite way to what you might imagine: lower is better. The results come out sorted, and the first result is the thing you queried for.

SEE ALSO ^

http://www.imgseek.net/

AUTHOR ^

Simon Cozens, <simon@cpan.org<gt>

All the clever bits were written by Ricardo Niederberger Cabral; I just mangled them to wrap Perl around them.

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

Copyright (C) 2005 by Simon Cozens

This library is free software; as it is a derivative work of imgseek, this library is distributed under the same terms (GPL) as imgseek.

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