Samson Monaco Tutankhamen > Data-Secs2-0.09 > Data::Secs2

Download:
Data-Secs2-0.09.tar.gz

Dependencies

Annotate this POD

CPAN RT

New  1
Open  0
View/Report Bugs
Module Version: 1.25   Source  

NAME ^

Data::Secs2 - pack, unpack, format, transform from Perl data SEMI E5-94 nested data.

SYNOPSIS ^

 #####
 # Subroutine interface
 #  
 use Data::Secs2 qw(arrayify config listify neuterify numberify perlify 
                 perl_typify secsify secs_elementify stringify textify transify);

 \@array  = arrayify($ref, @options);

 $old_value = config( $option );
 $old_value = config( $option => $new_value);

 $body = secs_elementify($format, $cells, @options);

 \@secs_obj  = listify(@vars);

 \@secs_obj  = neuterify($binary_secs, @options);

 \@vars  = perlify(\@secs_obj, @options);

 $ref  = perl_typify(\@array, @options);

 $ascii_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, @options);
 $binary_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, type => 'binary');

 $string = stringify(@arg, [@options]);

 \@secs_obj  = transify($acsii_secs, @options);

 #####
 # Class, Object interface
 #
 # For class interface, use Data::Secs2 instead of $self
 # use Data::Secs2;
 #
 $secs2 = 'Data::Secs2'  # uses built-in config object

 $secs2 = new Data::Secs2( @options );

 \@array  = secs2->arrayify( $ref, @options );

 $old_value = secs2->secs_config( $option);
 $old_value = secs2->secs_config( $option => $new_value);

 $body = secs2->secs_elementify($format, $cells, @options);

 \@secs_obj  = secs2->listify(@vars, @options);

 \@secs_obj  = secs2->neuterify($binary_secs, @options);

 \@vars  = secs2->perlify(\@secs_obj, @options);

 $ref  = secs2->perl_typify(\@array, @options);

 $ascii_secs = secs2->secsify( \@secs_obj, @options);
 $binary_secs = secs2->secsify( \@secs_obj, type => 'binary');

 $body = secs2->stringify( @arg );

 \@secs_obj  = secs2->transify($acsii_secs, @options);

Generally, if a subroutine will process a list of options, @options, that subroutine will also process an array reference, \@options, [@options], or hash reference, \%options, {@options}. If a subroutine will process an array reference, \@options, [@options], that subroutine will also process a hash reference, \%options, {@options}. See the description for a subroutine for details and exceptions.

DESCRIPTION ^

The Data::SECS2 module provides a widely accepted method of packing nested lists into a linear string and unpacking the string of nested lists. Nested data has a long history in mathematics. In the hardware world, data and data passed between hardware is not stored in SQL style tables but nested lists. One widely used standard for transmitting nested list between machines is SEMI E5-94.

The Data::Secs2 program module facilitates the secsification of the nested data in accordance with SEMI, http://www.semi.org, E5-94, Semiconductor Equipment Communications Standard 2 (SECS-II), pronounced 'sex two' with gussto and a perverted smile. The SEMI E4 SECS-I standard addresses transmitting SECSII messages from one machine to another machine serially via RS-232 RW-422 or whatever. And, there is another SECS standard for TCP/IP, the SEMI E37 standard, High-Speed SECS Message Services (HSMS) Generic Services.

In order not to plagarize college students, credit must be given where credit is due. Tony Blair, when he was a college intern at Intel Fab 4, in Manchester, England invented the SEMI SECS standards. When the Intel Fab 4 management discovered Tony's secsification of their host and equipment, they called a board of directors meeting, voted, and elected to have security to escort Tony out the door. This was Mr. Blair's introduction to voting and elections which he leverage into being elected prime minister of all of England. In this new position he used the skills he learned at the Intel fab to secsify intelligence reports on Iraq's weopons of mass distruction.

Using a well-known, widely-used standard for packing and unpacking Perl nested data provides many different new directions. Not only is this standard essential in real-time communications in the factory between equipment computers and operating systems and host computer and operating system but it has uses in snail-time computations. In snail-time the standard's data structure is usefull in nested data operations such as comparing nested data, storing the packed nested data in a file, and also for transmitting nested data from one Perl site to another or even between Perl and other programming languages.

And do not forget the added benefit (or perhaps fault depending upon your point of view) of SEMI SECS humor and that the real originators of the SECS-II yielded and allowed Tony Blair to take illegal credit for inventing SECS-II. After all the practical definition of politics is getting your own way. Julius Ceasar invented the Julian calendar and the month of July, Augustus Ceasar the month of Auguest, Al Gore the information highway and Tony Blair not only SECS-II but SECS-I and High-Speed SECS.

SECSII Format

The nested data linear format used by the Data::Secs2 suroutines is in accordance with SEMI, http://www.semi.org, E5-94, Semiconductor Equipment Communications Standard 2 (SECS-II), pronounced 'sex two' with gussto and a perverted smile. This industry standard is copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without violating the copyright. However for those who have brought the original hard media copy, there are robot help and Perl POD open source copyrighted versions of the SECII hard copy copyrighted version available. The base copyright is hard copy paper and PDF files available from

 Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International
 805 East Middlefield Road,
 Mountain View, CA 94043-4080 USA
 (415) 964-5111
 Easylink: 62819945
 http://www.semi.org

Other important SEMI standards address message transfer protocol of SECSII messages. They are the SEMI E4 SECS-I for transmitting SECSII messages from one machine to another machine via RS-232 and the SEMI E37 High-Speed SECS Message Services (HSMS) Generic Services for transmitting SECSII via TCP/IP.

In order not to plagarize college students, credit must be given where credit is due. Tony Blair, when he was a college intern at Intel Fab 4, in London invented the SEMI SECS standards. When the Intel Fab 4 management discovered Tony's secsification of their host and equipment, they elected to have security to escort Tony out the door. This was Mr. Blair's introduction to elections which he leverage into being elected prime minister. In this new position he used the skills he learned at the Intel fab to secsify intelligence reports on Iraq's weopons of mass distruction.

The SEMI E5 SECS-II standard provides, among many other things, a standard method of forming packed nested list data. In accordance with SEMI E5 SECS-II transmitted information consists of items and lists. An item consists of the following:

  1. an item header(IH) with a format code, and the number of bytes in the following body
  2. followed by the item body (IB) consisting of a number of elements.

A item (IB) may consist of zero bytes in which there are no body bytes for that item. As established by SEMI E5-94, 6.2.2,

As specified in E4-95 6.3, a list element consists of an ordered set of elements that are either an item element or a list element. Because a list element may contains a list element, and SEMI E5 places no restriction on the level of nesting, SECSII lists may be nested to theoretically to any level. Practically nested is limited by machine resources. A list has the same header format as an item, no body and the length number is the number of elements in the list instead of the number of bytes in the body.

The item and list header format codes are as in below Table 1

               Table 1 Item Format Codes

 unpacked   binary  octal  hex   description
 ----------------------------------------
 L          000000   00    0x00  LIST (length of elements, not bytes)
 B          001000   10    0x20  Binary
 T          001001   11    0x24  Boolean
 A          010000   20    0x40  ASCII
 J          010001   21    0x44  JIS-8
 S8         011000   30    0x60  8-byte integer (signed)
 S1         011001   31    0x62  1-byte integer (signed)
 S2         011010   32    0x64  2-byte integer (signed)
 S4         011100   34    0x70  4-byte integer (signed)
 F8         100000   40    0x80  8-byte floating
 F4         100100   44    0x90  4-byte floating
 U8         101000   50    0xA0  8-byte integer (unsigned)
 U1         101001   51    0xA4  1-byte integer (unsigned)
 U2         101010   52    0xA8  2-byte integer (unsigned)
 U4         101100   54    0xB0  4-byte integer (unsigned)

Table 1 complies to SEMI E5-94 Table 1, p.94, with an unpack text symbol and hex columns added. The hex column is the upper Most Significant Bits (MSB) 6 bits of the format code in the SEMI E5-94 item header (IH) or list header (LH) with the the lower Least Significant BIt (LSB) set to zero.

Figure 1 below provides the layout for a SEMI E5-94 header and complies to SEMI E5-94 Figure 2, p. 92, except Figure 1 renumbers the bits from 0 to 7 instead of from 1 to 8.

                              bits                                    
   MSB                                                     LSB
   
    7        6       5       4       3       2      1       0
 +-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+
 | Format code                                   |# length bytes | 
 +---------------------------------------------------------------+
 |MSB                MS length byte                         LSB  |
 +---------------------------------------------------------------+
 |                    length byte                                |
 +---------------------------------------------------------------+
 |                   LS length byte                              |
 +---------------------------------------------------------------+

                Figure 1 Item and List Header

SECS Object

This section establishes a formal definition of a SECS Object and introduces technical definitions that supercede Webster Dictionary definitions and only apply for the content of this Program Module for the following: SECS Object (SECS-OBJ), Element, Item Element (IE), List Element (LE), Element Header (EH), Element Format Code (EFC), Element Body (EB) and Element Cells (EC). If any of the technical definitions appear to have sexual innuendos, it is entirely coincidental. The definitions should be interpereted only on their technical merits. Any other interperetation is totally unprofessional.

A SECS Object is a Perl ARRAY that mimics the SEMI E5-94 SECS-II, section 6, data structure where SECS-II transmitted bytes are layed out in memory. The relation between between SEMI E5-94 "byte sent first" is that "bytes sent first" will have the lowest byte address.

A SECS Object consists of consecutive ordered Elements stored as a Perl ARRAY. Each Element takes two consistive positions in the Perl <ARRAY>: the Element Header and the Element Body. The Element Headers positions are always even number indices where the Element Bodies positions are always odd number indices.

The EH consists of and only of a Element Format Code as specified in the Table 1 Item Format Codes unpack column.

Elements may be either an Item Element or a List Element. The Element Body for a List Element is the sum of the nested List Elements and Item Elements in the List Element. The Element Body for a Item Element is a group of Element Cells of the same data representation and bytes per Element Cell. The bytes in an body of an Item Element is, thus, the number of cells in the body times the bytes per Element Cell. The Element Body for each Element Format Code is as follows:

L

unpacked sum of nested Element Lists and Element Items in the Element List

S U F T

scalar number or an reference to an array of numbers in accordance with the format type

A J

unpacked string

B

packed numberified Perl SCALAR of binary bytes or a reference to a Perl SCALLAR of unpack textified binary in the hex 'H*' Perl format

In short, a Perl SECS Object consists of a LIST group of SECS elements, INDEX group of elements, or SECSII item element as follows:

 LIST, INDEX, and SCALAR

 LIST => 'L', $number-of-elements, 
           'A', $class,
           'A', $built-in-class,
           @cells

 $cells[$i] may contain a LIST, INDEX or SCALAR)

 INDEX => 'L' '3', 'A', ' ', 'A' 'Index', 'U1', $position  
   
 SCALAR = $format, $scalar

where $format is any SECSII item element format code (no list element format codes allowed for SCALAR and $position is a linear index of the Perl SECSII Object array. In the Perl SECS Object INDEX, the 'U1' may be 'U2', or 'U4'. The 'U8' format code will never occur because SECSII messages cannot be that large. The length byte is limited to three bytes.

The first element of a SECS Object is always a SECS Object Format Code U1 and a packed element body of either a numberfied 'P' or 'S', textified 80 or 83, depending upon whether the SECS Object has information necessary to convert to Perl data structure, 'P', or most remain as a SECS Object, 'S'.

SUBROUTINES ^

arrayify

 \@array  = arrayify( $ref);
 \@array  = arrayify( $ref, @options);
 \@array  = arrayify( $ref, [@options]);
 \@array  = arrayify( $ref, {@options});

The purpose of the arrayify subroutine is to provide a canoncial array representation of Perl reference types. When $var is not a reference, the arrayify subroutine passes $var through unchanged; otherewise, the ref($ref) is changed to a reference to a canoncial array where the first member is the the $var class, the second member the underlying data type. If ref($var) and the underlying type type are the same, then $var is classless and the first member is the empty string ''. The rest of the members of the canonical array, based on the underlying data type, are as follows:

'HASH'

hash key, value pairs, sorted by the key

'ARRAY'

members of the array

'SCALAR'

the scalar

'REF'

the reference

'CODE'

the reference

'GLOB'

values of the GLOB in the following order:

 *$var{SCALAR},
 *$var{ARRAY},
 *$var{HASH},
 *$var{CODE},
 *$var{IO},
 *$var{NAME},
 *$var{PACKAGE},
 "*$var"

If the arrayify subroutine encounters an event where it cannot continue, it halts processing, and returns the event as a scalar string, with the subroutine name and version. If the reference of the arrayify subroutine return is a 'ARRAY', the return is \@array; otherwise it is a scalar text event message.

The events are as follows:

 "Unknown underlying data type\n"

config

 $old_value = config( $option );
 $old_value = config( $option => $new_value);
 (@all_options) = config( );

When Perl loads the Data::Secs2 program module, Perl creates a $Data::Secs2::default_options object using the new method which inherits Data::Startup.

Using the config as a subroutine

 config(@_) 

writes and reads the $Data::Secs2::default_options object directly using the Data::Startup::config method. Avoided the config and in multi-threaded environments where separate threads are using Data::Secs2. All other subroutines are multi-thread safe. They use override to obtain a copy of the $Data::Secs2::default_options and apply any option changes to the copy keeping the original intact.

Using the config as a method,

 $options->config(@_)

writes and reads the $options object using the Data::Startup::config method. It goes without saying that that object should have been created using one of the following or equivalent:

 $default_options = $class->Data::Secs2::new(@_);
 $default_options = new Data::Secs2(@_);
 $options = $default_options->override(@_);

The underlying object data for the Data::Secs2 class of objects is a hash. For object oriented conservative purist, the config subroutine is the accessor function for the underlying object hash.

Since the data are all options whose names and usage is frozen as part of the Data::Secs2 interface, the more liberal minded, may avoid the config accessor function layer, and access the object data directly.

The options are as follows: values subroutine option default 1sts ---------------------------------------------------------- die warn

 arrayify
 listify

 neuterify          obj_format_code      '', 'S','P'
                    add_obj_format_code  0
                    scalar               0 1
   unpack_num       'Data::SecsPack'     {}  

 perlify            
 perl_typify

 secsify            spaces               '  ', (' ' x n)
                    type                 'ascii','binary

 secs_elementify    type                 'ascii','binary
                    scalar               0 1
   pack_num         'Data::SecsPack'     {}  

 stringify

 transify           obj_format_code      '', 'S','P' 
                    add_obj_format_code  0

The secs_elementify subroutine undef the binary option uses the &Data::SecsPack::pack_num subroutine and neuterify subroutine uses the &Data::SecsPack::unpack_num routine. The 'Data::SecsPack' hash passes options to these two Data::SecsPack program module subroutine. See Data::SecsPack for a description of the available options.

The die and warn options causes all subroutines to issue warnings or die when an event occurs.

The config subroutine has no events or errors.

listify

 \@secs_obj  = listify(@vars);

The listify subroutine takes a list of Perl variables, @arg that may contain references to nested data and converts it to a <SECS Object that mimics a SECSII data structure of a linearized list of items. The Secs Object has Secs Object format code P' since it contains all the information necessary to contruct a Perl data structure.

Information is included to recontruct Perl hashes, arrays and objects by provided two item header for each Perl data type. The first item is the object class which is empty for Perl hashes and arrays and the second item is the Perl underlying data type. Valid Perl underlying data types are: HASH ARRAY SCALAR REF GLOB.

The listify subroutine walks the Perl data structure. Undefineds are converted to a SECS-II to empty list element L[0]. Scalars are tested for numbers. If the listify subroutine finds a scalar is a number, it converts it to a SECS-II U1 U2 U4 U8 S1 S2 S4 S8 F4 F8 item element with the preference in the order the formats are listed; otherwise the scalar is converted to a A SECS-II item element. When the listify subroutine finds a reference it applies the arrayify subroutine and converts it to a SECS-II list element with the array members as item or list elements of the SECS-II list element.

The output for the listify subroutine is a Secs Object that complies to the SECS Object established herein above.

The listify subroutine has no events or errors.

neuterify

 \@secs_obj  = neuterify($binary_secs);
 \@secs_obj  = neuterify($binary_secs, @options);
 \@secs_obj  = neuterify($binary_secs, [@options]);
 \@secs_obj  = neuterify($binary_secs, {@options});

The neuterify subroutine produces a @secs_obj from a SEMI E5-94 packed data structure $binary_secs and produces a SECS object @secs_obj.

The neuterify subroutine uses option {obj_format_code = 'P'}>, or {obj_format_code = 'S'}> as the value for the leading SECS Object U1 format byte. SEMI E5-94 SECII item. If the neuterify subroutine receives the option {add_obj_format_code}, neuterify will add the byte to the beginning of the packed data; otherwise, neuterify probes the leading byte of the packed data. If the probes shows the leading byte is a Secs Object Format Code, neuterify modifies the packed data byte; otherweise it adds the byte to the beginning of the packed data.

The return is either a reference to a SECS Object or case of an error an error message. To determine an error from a SECS Object , check if the return is a reference or a reference to an ARRAY.

The neuterify subroutine takes a scalar option and unpacks non-compliant SEMI E5-94, 6.2.1 and 6.3.1 which states:

 A zero-length in the format byte is illegal and produces an error.

This is a Bill Gates so use with discretion.

The neuterify unpacks numeric formats with zero-length for the bytes per length field in the format byte and no length bytes with one byte cell as a SESC Object numeric scalar. Examples of numeric scalars and numeric arrays follow:

 U4        # scalar numeric item element
 10000

 U4        # array numeric item element
 [10000]

Without the scalar option, the neuterify subroutine complies to SEMI E5-94, 6.2.1 and 6.3.1 and produces an error.

If the neuterify subroutine encounters an event where it cannot continue, it halts processing, and returns the event as a scalar string, with the subroutine name and version. If the reference of the neuterify subroutine return is a 'ARRAY', the return is \@secs_obj; otherwise it is a scalar text event message.

The events are as follows:

 "Unknown SECSII format, $format\n"
 'Number ' . (join ' ',@$number) . "not a scalar\n" # option scalar => 1
 "Format byte length size field is zero.\n" # option scalar => 0
 "Bad length\n"

In addition, to these events, the neuterify subroutine passes along any events from the Data::SecsPack::unpack_num subroutine.

new

 $secs2 = new Data::Secs2();
 $secs2 = new Data::Secs2( @options );
 $secs2 = new Data::Secs2( [@options] );
 $secs2 = new Data::Secs2( {options} );

The new subroutine provides a method set local options once for any of the other subroutines. The options may be modified at any time by $secs2-config($option => $new_value)>. Calling any of the subroutines as a $secs2 method will perform that subroutine with the options saved in secs2.

perlify subroutine

 \@vars = perlify( \@secs_obj);
 \@vars = perlify( \@secs_obj, @options);
 \@vars = perlify( \@secs_obj, [@options]);
 \@vars = perlify( \@secs_obj, {@options});

The perlify subroutine converts a SECS Object with a SECS Object Format Code of 'P' into Perl variables. SECS Objests a format code 'P' should contain all the information necessary to reconstruct listified Perl Data Structure.

If the perlify subroutine encounters an event where it cannot continue, it halts processing, and returns the event as a scalar string, with the subroutine name and version. If the reference of the perlify subroutine return is a 'ARRAY', the return is \@vars; otherwise it is a scalar text event message.

The events are as follows:

 "Not a Perl SECS object\n"
 "Wrong format for Perl reference class, $type" 
 "Wrong format type for Perl reference underlying data type, $type"
 "No body for Perl reference.\n"
 "Perl index item has wrong format code, $format\n"
 "Perl Index body must have only one cell\n"
 "Unknown format type, $format\n"

In addition, to these events, the perlify subroutine passes along any events from the perl_typify subroutine.

perl_typify

 $ref = perl_typify(\@array);
 $ref = perl_typify(\@array, @options);
 $ref = perl_typify(\@array, [@options]);
 $ref = perl_typify(\@array, {@options});

The perl_typify subroutine converts an @array produced by the arrayify subroutine from a $ref back to a $ref.

If the perl_typify subroutine encounters an event where it cannot continue, it halts processing, and returns the event as a scalar string, with the subroutine name and version. If the reference of the perl_typify subroutine return exists, the return is $ref; otherwise it is a scalar text event message.

The events are as follows:

 "Bad scalar body\n"
 "Bad ref body\n"
 "Bad code body.\n"
 "Bad glob body\n"
 "Unknown underlying data type, $type\n"

secsify subroutine

 $ascii_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj);
 $ascii_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, @options);
 $ascii_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, [@options]);
 $ascii_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, {@options});

 $binary_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, type => 'binary');
 $binary_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, type => 'binary', @options);
 $binary_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, [type => 'binary',@options]);
 $binary_secs = secsify( \@secs_obj, {type => 'binary',@options});

The secsify subroutine processes each element in a SECS Object producing either an $ascii_sec text string or a SEMI E5 packed $binary_secs text string. The secsify subroutine does not care if the @secs_obj is a Perl SECS Object or just a plain or SECS Object. For the $ascii_sec output, the secsify subroutine produces one line of text for each SECS element, indenting the line $options-{spaces}> consist with each level of list nesting.

The secsify subroutine uses the secs_elementify subroutine to form the SECSII elements and passes its options to the secs_elementify subroutine.

If the secsify subroutine encounters an event where it cannot continue, it halts processing, and returns the event as a reference to a scalar string, with the subroutine name and version. If the reference of the secsify subroutine return does not exists, the return is either $ascii_secs or $binary_secs; otherwise it is a reference to a scalar text event message.

The events are as follows:

  "Unknown format $format\n"

In addition, to these events, the secs_elementify subroutine passes along any events from the perl_typify subroutine.

secs_elementify

 $body = secs_elementify($format, $cells);
 $body = secs_elementify($format, $cells, @options);
 $body = secs_elementify($format, $cells, [@options]);
 $body = secs_elementify($format, $cells, {options});

The secs_elementify subroutine is the low-level work horse for the secsify subroutine that produces a SEMI SECSII item $body from a Perl SECS Object item header $format and item body @cells.

The secs_elementify subroutine returns a $body based on the $format and $cells as follows:

option type = 'ascii'>

a text representation of the packed SEMI E5-94 element.

option type = 'binary'>

in accordance with a SEMI E5-94 SECII.

option type = 'binary', scalar =1>

SEMI E5-94 SECII except that scalar numbers are packed with no length bytes and the length byte size bits set to 0 in the format byte. This is non-compliant with SEMI E5-94, 6.2.1 and 6.3.1 which states:

 A zero-length in the format byte is illegal and produces an error.

This is a Bill Gates so use with discretion.

If the secs_elementify subroutine encounters an event where it cannot continue, it halts processing, and returns the event as a reference to a scalar string, with the subroutine name and version. If the reference of the secs_elementify subroutine return does not exists, the return is $body; otherwise, it is a reference to a scalar text event message.

 "Unknown format, $format\n
 "Could not pack number.\n"
 "Element length number is not unsigned integer\n"
 "Number of cells in the item is too big\n"

In addition, to these events, for the binary option, the secs_elementify subroutine passes along any events from the Data::SecsPack::pack_num subroutine.

stringify subroutine

The stringify subroutined stringifies a Perl data structure by applying the listify and secify subroutines.

transify

 \@secs_obj  = transify($acsii_secs);
 \@secs_obj  = transify($acsii_secs, @options);
 \@secs_obj  = transify($acsii_secs, [@options]);
 \@secs_obj  = transify($acsii_secs, {@options});

The transify subroutine takes a free style text consisting of list of secsii items and converts it to SECS Object. The transify subroutine is very liberal in what it accepts as valid input.

The number of body elements may be supplied either as enclosed in brackets of a "comma" after the unpacked format code. Text strings may be enclosed in parentheses, brackets, or any other character.

The enclosing ending character may be escaped with the backslash '\'. List may be counted by suppling a count in either brackets or following a comma after the 'L' format character or by enclosing parentheseses, bracketers or any other character.

The transify subroutine uses option {obj_format_code = 'P'}>, or {obj_format_code = 'S'}> as the value for the leading SECS Object U1 format byte. SEMI E5-94 SECII item. If the transify subroutine receives the option {add_obj_format_code}, transify will add the a Secs Object Format Code to the beginning of the @secs_obj; otherwise, transify probes the leading @secs_obj. If the probes shows the leading byte is a Secs Object Format Code, transify modifies the code; otherweise it a Secs Object Format Code to the beginning of the @secs_obj

If the secs_elementify subroutine encounters an event where it cannot continue, it halts processing, and returns the event as a scalar string, with the subroutine name and version, the $ascii_secs and <@secs_obj> at the time of the event. If the reference of the secs_elementify subroutine return exists, the return is \@secs_obj; otherwise, it is a text event message.

 "Unkown format $format\n"
 "Wrong number of numbers."
 "No matching $close_char for $open_char\n"
 "No format code\n"
 "open lists: \n" . Dumper(@open_lists)  # post processing check

The format of the @open_lists members is as folows:

position

The index in @secs_obj the a list was started

close character

The character that closes the list. This empty for counted lists. The counted_list item is 0 if this member contains a character suchs as ')', ']', '"', '\'' or '}'.

count

The number of elements processed for the open lists

counted_list

non-zero if a counted list.

REQUIREMENTS ^

The requirements are coming.

DEMONSTRATION ^

 #########
 # perl Secs2.d
 ###

~~~~~~ Demonstration overview ~~~~~

The results from executing the Perl Code follow on the next lines as comments. For example,

 2 + 2
 # 4

~~~~~~ The demonstration follows ~~~~~

     use File::Package;
     my $fp = 'File::Package';

     use Data::Secs2 qw(arrayify config listify neuterify numberify perlify 
          perl_typify secsify secs_elementify stringify textify transify);

     my $uut = 'Data::Secs2';
     my ($loaded, $event, $big_secs2);

 my $test_data1 =
 'U1[1] 80
 L[5]
   A[0]
   A[5] ARRAY
   N 2
   A[5] hello
   N 4
 ';

 my $test_data2 =
 'U1[1] 80
 L[6]
   A[0]
   A[4] HASH
   A[4] body
   A[5] hello
   A[6] header
   A[9] To: world
 ';

 my $test_data3 =
 'U1[1] 80
 N 2
 L[4]
   A[0]
   A[5] ARRAY
   A[5] hello
   A[5] world
 N 512
 ';

 my $test_data4 =
 'U1[1] 80
 N 2
 L[6]
   A[0]
   A[4] HASH
   A[6] header
   L[6]
     A[11] Class::None
     A[4] HASH
     A[4] From
     A[6] nobody
     A[2] To
     A[6] nobody
   A[3] msg
   L[4]
     A[0]
     A[5] ARRAY
     A[5] hello
     A[5] world
 ';

 my $test_data5 =
 'U1[1] 80
 L[6]
   A[0]
   A[4] HASH
   A[6] header
   L[6]
     A[11] Class::None
     A[4] HASH
     A[4] From
     A[6] nobody
     A[2] To
     A[6] nobody
   A[3] msg
   L[4]
     A[0]
     A[5] ARRAY
     A[5] hello
     A[5] world
 L[6]
   A[0]
   A[4] HASH
   A[6] header
   L[3]
     A[0]
     A[5] Index
     N 10
   A[3] msg
   L[3]
     A[0]
     A[5] ARRAY
     A[4] body
 ';

 my $test_data6 = [ [78,45,25], [512,1024], 100000 ];

 my $test_data7 = 'a50150010541004105' . unpack('H*','ARRAY') . 
                  'a5034e2d19' .  'a90402000400' . 'b104000186a0';

 my $test_data17 = 'a50150010541004105' . unpack('H*','ARRAY') . 
                  'a5034e2d19' .  'a90402000400' . 'b0000186a0';

 ##################
 # stringify an array
 # 

 stringify( '2', 'hello', 4 )

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #N 2
 #A[5] hello
 #N 4
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # stringify a hash reference
 # 

 stringify( {header => 'To: world', body => 'hello'})

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #L[6]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[4] HASH
 #  A[4] body
 #  A[5] hello
 #  A[6] header
 #  A[9] To: world
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # ascii secsify lisfication of test_data1 an array reference
 # 

 secsify( listify( ['2', 'hello', 4, 0, undef] ) )

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #L[7]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[5] ARRAY
 #  N 2
 #  A[5] hello
 #  N 4
 #  N 0
 #  L[0]
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # ascii secsify lisfication of test_data3 - array with an array ref
 # 

 secsify( listify( '2', ['hello', 'world'], 512 ) )

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #N 2
 #L[4]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[5] ARRAY
 #  A[5] hello
 #  A[5] world
 #N 512
 #'
 #
 my $obj = bless { To => 'nobody', From => 'nobody'}, 'Class::None'

 # bless( {
 #                 'From' => 'nobody',
 #                 'To' => 'nobody'
 #               }, 'Class::None' )
 #

 ##################
 # ascii secsify lisfication of test_data5 - hash with nested hashes, arrays, common objects
 # 

     secsify( listify( {msg => ['hello', 'world'] , header => $obj }, 
      {msg => [ 'body' ], header => $obj} ) )

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #L[6]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[4] HASH
 #  A[6] header
 #  L[6]
 #    A[11] Class::None
 #    A[4] HASH
 #    A[4] From
 #    A[6] nobody
 #    A[2] To
 #    A[6] nobody
 #  A[3] msg
 #  L[4]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[5] ARRAY
 #    A[5] hello
 #    A[5] world
 #L[6]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[4] HASH
 #  A[6] header
 #  L[3]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[5] Index
 #    N 10
 #  A[3] msg
 #  L[3]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[5] ARRAY
 #    A[4] body
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # ascii secsify listifcation perilification transfication of test_data4
 # 

 secsify( listify(perlify( transify($test_data4 ))) )

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #L[4]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[5] ARRAY
 #  N 2
 #  L[6]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[4] HASH
 #    A[6] header
 #    L[6]
 #      A[11] Class::None
 #      A[4] HASH
 #      A[4] From
 #      A[6] nobody
 #      A[2] To
 #      A[6] nobody
 #    A[3] msg
 #    L[4]
 #      A[0]
 #      A[5] ARRAY
 #      A[5] hello
 #      A[5] world
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # ascii secsify listifcation perilification transfication of test_data5
 # 

 secsify( listify(perlify( transify($test_data5))) )

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #L[4]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[5] ARRAY
 #  L[6]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[4] HASH
 #    A[6] header
 #    L[6]
 #      A[11] Class::None
 #      A[4] HASH
 #      A[4] From
 #      A[6] nobody
 #      A[2] To
 #      A[6] nobody
 #    A[3] msg
 #    L[4]
 #      A[0]
 #      A[5] ARRAY
 #      A[5] hello
 #      A[5] world
 #  L[6]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[4] HASH
 #    A[6] header
 #    L[3]
 #      A[0]
 #      A[5] Index
 #      N 16
 #    A[3] msg
 #    L[3]
 #      A[0]
 #      A[5] ARRAY
 #      A[4] body
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # binary secsify an array reference
 # 

 unpack('H*',secsify( listify( ['2', 'hello', 4] ), {type => 'binary'}))

 # '0101500105010001054152524159010102010568656c6c6f010104'
 #

 ##################
 # binary secsify numeric arrays
 # 

 unpack('H*',secsify( listify( $test_data6 ), [type => 'binary']))

 # '010150010501000105415252415901034e2d190104020004000104000186a0'
 #

 ##################
 # scalar binary secsify an array reference
 # 

 unpack('H*',secsify( listify( ['2', 'hello', 4] ), {type => 'binary', scalar => 1}))

 # '01015001050100010541525241590002010568656c6c6f0004'
 #

 ##################
 # scalar binary secsify numeric arrays
 # 

 unpack('H*',secsify( listify( $test_data6 ), type => 'binary', scalar => 1))

 # '010150010501000105415252415901034e2d1901040200040000000186a0'
 #

 ##################
 # binary secsify array with nested hashes, arrays, objects
 # 

 $big_secs2 = 
 'a501' . '50' .                       # U1[1] 80  Perl format code 
 'a501' . '02' .                       # U1[1] 2
 '0106' .                              # L[6]
 '4100' .                              #   A[0]
 '4104' . unpack('H*','HASH') .        #   A[4] HASH
 '4106' . unpack('H*','header') .      #   A[6] header
 '0106' .                              #   L[6]
 '410b' . unpack('H*','Class::None') . #     A[11] Class::None
 '4104' . unpack('H*','HASH') .        #     A[4] HASH
 '4104' . unpack('H*','From') .        #     A[4] From
 '4106' . unpack('H*','nobody') .      #     A[6] nobody
 '4102' . unpack('H*','To') .          #     A[2] To
 '4106' . unpack('H*','nobody') .      #     A[6] nobody
 '4103' . unpack('H*','msg') .         #   A[3] msg
 '0104' .                              #   L[4]
 '4100' .                              #     A[0]
 '4105' . unpack('H*','ARRAY') .       #     A[5] ARRAY
 '4105' . unpack('H*','hello') .       #     A[5] hello 
 '4105' . unpack('H*','world');        #     A[5] world

 ##################
 # neuterify a big secsii
 # 

 secsify(neuterify (pack('H*',$big_secs2)))

 # ''
 #

 ##################
 # neuterify binary secsii
 # 

 secsify(neuterify (pack('H*',$test_data7)))

 # ''
 #

 ##################
 # neuterify scalar binary secsii, length size error
 # 

    $event = neuterify (pack('H*',$test_data17));
    $event =~ s/\n\t.*?$//;
    while(chomp($event)) { };
 $event

 # 'Unknown SECSII format, '
 #

 ##################
 # neuterify scalar binary secsii, no error
 # 

 $event = neuterify (pack('H*',$test_data17), scalar => 1)
 ref($event)

 # ''
 #

 ##################
 # neuterify scalar binary secsii
 # 

 secsify($event)

 # ''
 #

 ##################
 # transify a free for all secsii input
 # 

     my $ascii_secsii =
 '
 L
 (
   A \'\' A \'HASH\' A \'header\'
   L [ A "Class::None"  A "HASH" 
       A  "From" A "nobody"
       A  "To" A "nobody"
     ]
   A "msg"
   L,4 A[0] A[5] ARRAY
     A  "hello" A "world"
 )

 L 
 (
   A[0] A "HASH"  A /header/
   L[3] A[0] A \'Index\' U1 10
   A  \'msg\'
   L < A[0] A \'ARRAY\' A  \'body\' >
 )

 '
 my $list = transify ($ascii_secsii, obj_format_code => 'P');
 ref($list)

 # 'ARRAY'
 #

 ##################
 # secsify transified free style secs text
 # 

 ref($list) ? secsify( $list ) : ''

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #L[6]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[4] HASH
 #  A[6] header
 #  L[6]
 #    A[11] Class::None
 #    A[4] HASH
 #    A[4] From
 #    A[6] nobody
 #    A[2] To
 #    A[6] nobody
 #  A[3] msg
 #  L[4]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[5] ARRAY
 #    A[5] hello
 #    A[5] world
 #L[6]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[4] HASH
 #  A[6] header
 #  L[3]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[5] Index
 #    U1 10
 #  A[3] msg
 #  L[3]
 #    A[0]
 #    A[5] ARRAY
 #    A[4] body
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # transify a bad free for all secsii input
 # 

     $ascii_secsii =
 '
 L
 ( 
   A "msg"
   L,4 A[0] A[5] world
 '
 $list = transify ($ascii_secsii);
 ref(\$list)

 # 'SCALAR'
 #
 $list

 # 'open lists: 
 #[
 #          1,
 #          ')',
 #          2,
 #          0
 #        ]
 #[
 #          5,
 #          '',
 #          2,
 #          4
 #        ]
 #      ascii_secs:
 #      SECS object:
 #'L'
 #0
 #'A'
 #'msg'
 #'L'
 #'4'
 #'A'
 #''
 #'A'
 #'world'
 #      Subroutine: Data::Secs2::transify 1.22
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # Perl listify numeric arrays
 # 

 ref(my $number_list = Data::Secs2->new(perl_secs_numbers => 'strict')->listify( $test_data6 ))

 # 'ARRAY'
 #

 ##################
 # secify Perl  listified numberic arrays
 # 

 secsify($number_list)

 # 'U1[1] 80
 #L[5]
 #  A[0]
 #  A[5] ARRAY
 #  N[3] 78 45 25
 #  N[2] 512 1024
 #  N 100000
 #'
 #

 ##################
 # read configuration
 # 

 [config('type')]

 # [
 #          'type',
 #          'ascii'
 #        ]
 #

 ##################
 # write configuration
 # 

 [config('type','binary')]

 # [
 #          'type',
 #          'ascii'
 #        ]
 #

 ##################
 # verify write configuration
 # 

 [config('type')]

 # [
 #          'type',
 #          'binary'
 #        ]
 #

 ##################
 # restore configuration
 # 

 [config('type','ascii')]

 # [
 #          'type',
 #          'binary'
 #        ]
 #

QUALITY ASSURANCE ^

Running the test script Secs2.t verifies the requirements for this module. The tmake.pl cover script for Test::STDmaker automatically generated the secs2.t test script, secs2.d demo script, and t::Data::Secs2 STD program module POD, from the t::Data::Secs2 program module contents. The t::Data::Secs2 program module is in the distribution file Data-Secs2-$VERSION.tar.gz.

NOTES ^

AUTHOR

The holder of the copyright and maintainer is

<support@SoftwareDiamonds.com>

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Copyright © 2003 2004 Software Diamonds

All Rights Reserved

BINDING REQUIREMENTS NOTICE

Binding requirements are indexed with the pharse 'shall[dd]' where dd is an unique number for each header section. This conforms to standard federal government practices, US DOD 490A 3.2.3.6. In accordance with the License, Software Diamonds is not liable for any requirement, binding or otherwise.

LICENSE

Software Diamonds permits the redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, provided that the following conditions are met:

  1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
  2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
  3. Commercial installation of the binary or source must visually present to the installer the above copyright notice, this list of conditions intact, that the original source is available at http://softwarediamonds.com and provide means for the installer to actively accept the list of conditions; otherwise, a license fee must be paid to Softwareware Diamonds.

SOFTWARE DIAMONDS, http://www.softwarediamonds.com, PROVIDES THIS SOFTWARE 'AS IS' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL SOFTWARE DIAMONDS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL,EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

SEE ALSO ^

Data::SecsPack
SEMI, http://www.semi.org,
Docs::Site_SVD::Data_Secs2
Test::STDmaker
syntax highlighting: