Станислав Пусеп > AnyEvent-Net-Curl-Queued-0.047 > YADA

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Module Version: 0.047   Source  

NAME ^

YADA - "Yet Another Download Accelerator": alias for AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued

VERSION ^

version 0.047

SYNOPSIS ^

    #!/usr/bin/env perl
    use common::sense;

    use YADA;

    YADA->new->append(
        [qw[
            http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/02_Language_Extensions/
            http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/02_Perl_Core_Modules/
            http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/03_Development_Support/
            ...
            http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/27_Pragma/
            http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/28_Perl6/
            http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/99_Not_In_Modulelist/
        ]] => sub {
            say $_[0]->final_url;
            say ${$_[0]->header};
        },
    )->wait;

WARNING: GONE MOO! ^

This module isn't using Any::Moose anymore due to the announced deprecation status of that module. The switch to the Moo is known to break modules that do extend 'AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued::Easy' / extend 'YADA::Worker'! To keep the compatibility, make sure that you are using MooseX::NonMoose:

    package YourSubclassingModule;
    use Moose;
    use MooseX::NonMoose;
    extends 'AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued::Easy';
    ...

Or MouseX::NonMoose:

    package YourSubclassingModule;
    use Mouse;
    use MouseX::NonMoose;
    extends 'AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued::Easy';
    ...

Or the Any::Moose equivalent:

    package YourSubclassingModule;
    use Any::Moose;
    use Any::Moose qw(X::NonMoose);
    extends 'AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued::Easy';
    ...

However, the recommended approach is to switch your subclassing module to Moo altogether (you can use MooX::late to smoothen the transition):

    package YourSubclassingModule;
    use Moo;
    use MooX::late;
    extends 'AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued::Easy';
    ...

DESCRIPTION ^

Use AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued with fewer keystrokes. Also, the easy things should be easy side of the package. For the hard things should be possible side, refer to the complete AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued documentation.

USAGE ^

The example in "SYNOPSIS" is equivalent to:

    #!/usr/bin/env perl
    use common::sense;

    use AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued;
    use AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued::Easy;

    my $q = AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued->new;
    $q->append(sub {
        AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued::Easy->new({
            initial_url => $_,
            on_finish   => sub {
                say $_[0]->final_url;
                say ${$_[0]->header};
            },
        })
    }) for qw(
        http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/02_Language_Extensions/
        http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/02_Perl_Core_Modules/
        http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/03_Development_Support/
        ...
        http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/27_Pragma/
        http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/28_Perl6/
        http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-category/99_Not_In_Modulelist/
    );
    $q->wait;

As you see, YADA overloads append/prepend from AnyEvent::Net::Curl::Queued, adding implicit constructor for the worker object. It also makes both methods return a reference to the queue object, so (almost) everything gets chainable. The implicit constructor is triggered only when append/prepend receives multiple arguments. The order of arguments (mostly) doesn't matter. Their meaning is induced by their reference type:

Beware!

YADA tries to follow the principle of least astonishment, at least when you play nicely. All the following snippets have the same meaning:

    $q->append(
        { retry => 3 },
        'http://www.cpan.org',
        'http://metacpan.org',
        sub { $_[0]->setopt(verbose => 1) }, # on_init placeholder
        \&on_finish,
    );

    $q->append(
        [qw[
            http://www.cpan.org
            http://metacpan.org
        ]],
        { retry => 3, opts => { verbose => 1 } },
        \&on_finish,
    );

    $q->append(
        URI->new($_) => \&on_finish,
        { retry => 3, opts => { verbose => 1 } },
    ) for qw[
        http://www.cpan.org
        http://metacpan.org
    ];

    $q->append(
        [qw[
            http://www.cpan.org
            http://metacpan.org
        ]] => {
            retry       => 3,
            opts        => { verbose => 1 },
            on_finish   => \&on_finish,
        }
    );

However, you will be astonished if you specify multiple distinct on_init and on_finish or try to sneak in initial_url through attributes! At least, RTFC if you seriously attempt to do that.

SEE ALSO ^

AUTHOR ^

Stanislaw Pusep <stas@sysd.org>

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE ^

This software is copyright (c) 2014 by Stanislaw Pusep.

This is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as the Perl 5 programming language system itself.

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