Michael Peters > Data-FormValidator-Constraints-DateTime > Data::FormValidator::Constraints::DateTime

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NAME ^

Data::FormValidator::Constraints::DateTime - D::FV constraints for dates and times

DESCRIPTION ^

This package provides constraint routines for Data::FormValidator for dealing with dates and times. It provides an easy mechanism for validating dates of any format (using strptime(3)) and transforming those dates (as long as you 'untaint' the fields) into valid DateTime objects, or into strings that would be properly formatted for various database engines.

ABSTRACT ^

  use Data::FormValidator;
  use Data::FormValidator::Constraints::DateTime qw(:all);
    
  # create our profile
  my $profile = {
      required                => [qw(my_date)],
      constraint_methods      => {
          my_date   => to_datetime('%D'), # in the format MM/DD/YYYY
      },
      untaint_all_constraints => 1,
  };

  # validate 'my_date'
  my $results = Data::FormValidator->check($my_input, $profile);

  if( $results->success ) {
    # if we got here then $results->valid('my_date')
    # is a valid DateTime object 
    my $datetime = $results->valid('my_date');
    .
    .
  }

STRPTIME FORMATS ^

Most of the validation routines provided by this module use strptime(3) format strings to know what format your date string is in before we can process it. You specify this format for each date you want to validate using by passing it to constraint generation routine (see the example above).

We use DateTime::Format::Strptime for this transformation. If you need a list of these formats (if you haven't yet committed them to memory) you can see the strptime(3) man page (if you are on a *nix system) or you can see the DateTime::Format::Strptime documentation.

There are however some routines that can live without the format param. These include routines which try and validate according to rules for a particular database (to_mysql_* and to_pg_*). If no format is provided, then we will attempt to validate according to the rules for that datatype in that database (using DateTime::Format::MySQL and DateTime::Format::Pg). Here are some examples:

without a format param

 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(my_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
       my_date => to_mysql_datetime(),
   },
 };

with a format param

 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(my_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
       my_date => to_mysql_datetime('%m/%d/%Y'),
   },
 };

DateTime::Format Objects

Using strptime(3) format strings gives a lot of flexibility, but sometimes not enough. Suppose you have a web form that allows the user to input a date in the format '11/21/2006' or simply '11/21/06'. A simple format string is not enough. To take full advantage of the DateTime project, any place that you can pass in a strptime(3) format string, you can also pass in a DateTime::Format object. To solve the above problem you might have code that looks like this:

  # your formatter code
  package MyProject::DateTime::FlexYear;
  use DateTime::Format::Strptime;

  use DateTime::Format::Builder (
    parsers => { 
      parse_datetime => [
        sub { eval { DateTime::Format::Strptime->new(pattern => '%m/%d/%Y')->parse_datetime($_[1]) } },
        sub { eval { DateTime::Format::Strptime->new(pattern => '%m/%d/%y')->parse_datetime($_[1]) } },
      ] 
    }
  );

  1;

  # in your web validation code
  my $profile = {
    required           => [qw(my_date)],
    constraint_methods => {
        my_date => to_mysql_datetime(MyProject::DateTime::FlexYear->new()),
    },
  };

VALIDATION ROUTINES ^

Following is the list of validation routines that are provided by this module.

to_datetime

The routine will validate the date aginst a strptime(3) format and change the date string into a DateTime object. This routine must have an accompanying strptime format param.

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

ymd_to_datetime

This routine is used to take multiple inputs (one each for the year, month, and day) and combine them into a DateTime object, validate the resulting date, and give you the resulting DateTime object in your valid() results. It must recieve as params the year, month, and day inputs in that order. You may also specify additional params that will be interpretted as 'hour', 'minute' and 'second' values to use. If none are provided, then the time '00:00:00' will be used.

 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(my_year)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      my_year => ymd_to_datetime(qw(my_year my_month my_day my_hour my_min my_sec)),
   },
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

before_today

This routine will validate the date and make sure it less than or equal to today (using DateTime->today). It takes one param which is the <strptime|DateTime::Format::Strptime> format string for the date.

If it validates and you tell D::FV to untaint this parameter it will be converted into a DateTime object.

 # make sure they weren't born in the future
 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(birth_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      birth_date => before_today('%m/%d/%Y'),
   },
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

after_today

This routine will validate the date and make sure it is greater than or equal to today (using DateTime->today()). It takes only one param, which is the strptime format for the date being validated.

If it validates and you tell D::FV to untaint this parameter it will be converted into a DateTime object.

 # make sure the project isn't already due
 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(death_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      death_date => after_today('%m/%d/%Y'),
   },
   untaint_all_constraints => 1,
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

ymd_before_today

This routine will validate the date and make sure it less than or equal to today (using DateTime->today). It works just like ymd_to_datetime in the parameters it takes.

If it validates and you tell D::FV to untaint this parameter it will be converted into a DateTime object.

 # make sure they weren't born in the future
 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(birth_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      birth_date => ymd_before_today(qw(dob_year dob_month dob_day)),
   },
   untaint_all_constraints => 1,
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

ymd_after_today

This routine will validate the date and make sure it greater than or equal to today (using DateTime->today). It works just like ymd_to_datetime in the parameters it takes.

If it validates and you tell D::FV to untaint this parameter it will be converted into a DateTime object.

 # make sure the project isn't already due
 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(due_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      birth_date => ymd_after_today(qw(dob_year dob_month dob_day)),
   },
   untaint_all_constraints => 1,
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

before_datetime

This routine will validate the date and make sure it occurs before the specified date. It takes two params:

If it validates and you tell D::FV to untaint this parameter it will be converted into a DateTime object.

 # make sure they were born before 1979
 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(birth_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      birth_date => before_datetime('%m/%d/%Y', '01/01/1979'),
   },
   untaint_all_constraints => 1,
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

after_datetime

This routine will validate the date and make sure it occurs after the specified date. It takes two params:

 # make sure they died after they were born
 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(birth_date death_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      death_date => after_datetime('%m/%d/%Y', 'birth_date'),
   },
   untaint_all_constraints => 1,
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

between_datetimes

This routine will validate the date and make sure it occurs after the first specified date and before the second specified date. It takes three params:

 # make sure they died after they were born
 my $profile = {
   required                => [qw(birth_date death_date marriage_date)],
   constraint_methods      => {
      marriage_date => between_datetimes('%m/%d/%Y', 'birth_date', 'death_date'),
   },
   untaint_all_constraints => 1,
 };

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

DATABASE RELATED VALIDATION ROUTINES ^

to_mysql_datetime

The routine will change the date string into a DATETIME datatype suitable for MySQL. If you don't provide a format parameter then this routine will just validate the data as a valid MySQL DATETIME datatype (using DateTime::Format::MySQL).

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

to_mysql_date

The routine will change the date string into a DATE datatype suitable for MySQL. If you don't provide a format param then this routine will validate the data as a valid DATE datatype in MySQL (using DateTime::Format::MySQL).

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

to_mysql_timestamp

The routine will change the date string into a TIMESTAMP datatype suitable for MySQL. If you don't provide a format then the data will be validated as a MySQL TIMESTAMP datatype.

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

to_pg_datetime

The routine will change the date string into a DATETIME datatype suitable for PostgreSQL. If you don't provide a format then the data will validated as a DATETIME datatype in PostgresSQL (using DateTime::Format::Pg).

If the value is untainted (using untaint_all_constraints or untaint_constraint_fields, it will change the date string into a DateTime object.

AUTHOR ^

Michael Peters <mpeters@plusthree.com>

Thanks to Plus Three, LP (http://www.plusthree.com) for sponsoring my work on this module

CONTRIBUTORS ^

Mark Stosberg <mark@summersault.com>
Charles Frank <cfrank@plusthree.com>
Aaron Ross <aaronelliotross@gmail.com>

SUPPORT ^

This module is a part of the larger Data::FormValidator project. If you have questions, comments, bug reports or feature requests, please join the Data::FormValidator's mailing list.

CAVEAT ^

When passing parameters to typical Data::FormValidator constraints you pass plain scalars to refer to query params and scalar-refs to refer to literals. We get around that in this module by assuming everything could be refering to a query param, and if one is not found, then it's a literal. This works well unless you have query params with names like '01/02/2005' or '%m/%d/%Y'.

And if you do, shame on you for having such horrible names.

SEE ALSO ^

Data::FormValidator, DateTime. DateTime::Format::Strptime, DateTime::Format::MySQL, DateTime::Format::Pg

COPYRIGHT & LICENSE ^

Copyright Michael Peters 2010, all rights reserved.

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself.

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